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Sunday, June 13
 

4:00pm

12:00am

 
Monday, June 14
 

7:00am

8:00am

First Time Orientation
First-time conference attendees, maximize your conference participation by asking questions of conference staff, networking with other first-time attendees, and taking a hotel tour.

Monday June 14, 2010 8:00am - 9:00am
Blue Room Pre-Function

8:30am

Research Track Workshop: Interested in Global Health Research? Going in with your Eyes Open
Limited Capacity seats available

There are numerous global health challenges and a pressing need to develop creative novel solutions to combat these. This 3-hour workshop will target health professionals and new researchers who are interested in planning and participating in global health research. The workshop will include discussion of the various types of global health research including topical, methodological, and organizational differences. It will also encompass discussion of the practicalities of research, including the need for Institutional Review Board approval, developing and maintaining collaborative partnerships, clarifying funding issues, planning appropriately for adequate personnel, ensuring high quality data collection and analysis, and achieving equity when publishing and presenting resulting data. Presenters will engage participants in discussion surrounding the myriad issues associated with getting a study started, using case-studies to illustrate specific challenges new researchers are likely to encounter. Presenters will also provide participants will resources to assist them in generating new ideas for research, identifying funding sources, and writing grant proposals. Participants are encouraged but not required to come to the workshop with nascent ideas for potential research studies.

Monday June 14, 2010 8:30am - 11:30am
Executive Room

8:30am

W1, Part I: Goals: Putting a Deadline on Your Vision | Setting, Monitoring & Evaluating Your Goals
People can easily understand the value and necessity of personal goals. Larger, more encompassing goals, however, are often met with doubt about feasibility and practicality or even whether they are needed at all. This workshop will examine how goals are already at work in our lives and what that means to us individually and collectively. We will use hands-on tools to illustrate the value of setting goals; the unintended consequences of not having goals and the importance of writing them down and committing to achieving them - No matter what!

Monday June 14, 2010 8:30am - 11:30am
Ambassador Ballroom

8:30am

W2: Modern Measures and Metrics: Assessing Health Workforce Training and Education
Limited Capacity seats available

Workshop attendees will learn about new measures of program quality, new approaches for detecting complex performance outcomes, and a synthesis of existing research to inform instructional design and the evaluation of future training programs. The session will introduce modern metrics, measures, efficacy, and validation tools and practices.

Monday June 14, 2010 8:30am - 11:30am
Congressional Room

8:30am

W3: How to Develop a Health Insurance Scheme Targeted to the Poor
Limited Capacity seats available

Many countries that subscribe to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have committed to ensuring access to basic health services for their citizens. Health insurance has been considered and promoted as the major financing mechanism to improve access to health services, as well to provide financial risk protection.

Monday June 14, 2010 8:30am - 11:30am
Hampton Ballroom

8:30am

W4, Part I: Let Us Walk you Through Designing your Health Care Improvement Project!
Limited Capacity seats available

The workshop is aimed at enabling participants to design their own improvement project applying the principles of modern health care improvement to the participant's area of choice.The workshop will provide an overview to the principles and methods of health care improvement. It aims at developing participants' knowledge and skills in the principles and methods of modern health care improvement, including aim-setting, indicator development, process analysis, and developing tests of change using plan-do-study-act cycles for implementing improvement interventions. It will contain a series of short plenary presentations and small group exercises, as well as plenary discussions, Q&A, and reflection. Examples of improvements achieved in different areas of care in developing country settings will be given throughout the workshop.This workshop will allow participants to design their own QI project with hands-on guidance from HCI field and headquarters staff. The main steps in designing an improvement project will be discussed, followed by small group work assisted by HCI facilitators to allow participants to apply the principles to design an improvement project based on a real priority for improvement they have identified. The example used in the workshop will be based on the Framework for Improving Care for Patients on Antiretroviral Theapy. However, participants will be able to chose an example of their own to design their improvement project during the day.

Monday June 14, 2010 8:30am - 11:30am
Blue Room

9:00am

Policy Track: Global Health Budget Landscape
Do you sometimes feel lost trying to navigate the U.S. foreign assistance world to find out what's in global health? Have you ever wondered how much is the total U.S. contribution to global health? What's in it? Then this is the session for you. This session will help you better understand the U.S. global health budget architecture, structure, what the money is used for, and what the civil society response has been to U.S. global health budget.

Monday June 14, 2010 9:00am - 10:30am
Governors Room

9:00am

The Implementing Best Practices (IBP) 10th Anniversary Breakfast
WHO, USAID and partners of the Implementing Best Practice (IBP) in Reproductive Health Consortium invite you to join a celebration marking the 10-year anniversary of the IBP Initiative. This breakfast event will highlight a decade of activities, milestones, and achievements of the IBP partnership in our efforts to work at the global, regional and country level to harmonize approaches, reduce duplication and support the implementation and scaling up of proven effective practices. The agenda includes speakers from WHO, USAID, UNFPA, and IBP partners in the field, highlighting how the IBP Consortium has contributed to improving reproductive health outcomes worldwide. Join us and celebrate the power of partnership!
http://www.ibpinitiative.org/

Monday June 14, 2010 9:00am - 11:00am
Palladian Ballroom

9:30am

Climate Change, Food Security, and Household Health: The Right Metrics for the Right Country-Level Policy Choices
Climate Change, Food Security, and Household Health: The Right Metrics for the Right Country-Level Policy Choices The triple shock of food price hikes, soaring energy prices, and a global financial meltdown could be an early indicator for looming food insecurity and threats to household health. WHO estimates that 150,000 deaths already occur annually in low-income countries due to the effects of climate change on crop failures and malnutrition, and on the increased incidence and severity of floods, diarrheal diseases, and malaria. Emerging trends in household health, food security, and climate change will create newer challenges for human health that need to be understood and contextualized to inform country-level health policy decisions; despite global efforts, data show that progress toward Millennium Development Goals is slow and uneven, with outcomes for the most vulnerable sometimes worsening. Join us for a keynote overview of these emerging trends, followed by table discussions on information and policies needed to enhance country-level decision-making, led by experienced thought leaders in the field.
http://www.icfi.com/

Monday June 14, 2010 9:30am - 11:30am
Diplomat Ballroom

9:30am

The Health Open Educational Resources Network: Building Capacity for Health Education in Africa
This event will be a unique networking opportunity to explore the potential of using Open Educational Resource (OER) frameworks to leverage and maximize the impact of initiatives in health education in Africa, with a view to accelerating the creation of capacity in African health-care systems. This process will result in the establishment of a consortial approach to building a long- term program for health OER.
http://www.hewlett.org/http://www.oerafrica.org/http://www.umich.edu/

Monday June 14, 2010 9:30am - 11:30am
Empire Ballroom

10:00am

Volunteer Orientation
Monday June 14, 2010 10:00am - 11:00am
Blue Room Pre-Function

11:45am

Welcome Reception and Regional Meet-Ups
Reconnect with global health colleagues from around the world at a lunch reception designed for extensive networking opportunities and regional meet-and-greets. Kindle new partnerships with others working in your region. Energize yourself for a week filled with shared learning, and new opportunities to take action.

Monday June 14, 2010 11:45am - 12:45pm
Regency Ballroom

1:00pm

Film Series: Foul Water/Fiery Serpent
Foul Water/Fiery Serpent is a new documentary feature film that follows dedicated health workers engaged in a final battle to eradicate a horrific disease in Africa. For thousands of years the Guinea worm parasite (Dracunculus medinensis) has caused disabling misery, infecting people who drink water contaminated with the worm's larvae. After growing inside the victim for a year, the adult worm, up to three feet long, emerges from the body through an agonizing skin blister that can incapacitate and cripple. For nearly three years, Foul Water/Fiery Serpent tracks determined teams of men and women as they fight the closing skirmishes to wipe out the last Guinea worms in Ghana and Sudan. Attacking the parasites where they thrive - in poor, remote villages that rely on contaminated water - they distribute filter cloths, treat water sources with safe pesticide, educate villagers about avoiding the worms, and treat victims suffering from the disease. Through a relentless cycle of successes and failures, facing ignorance and superstition in a vast landscape ravaged by war, the heroes in this story are making medical history in an epic struggle to drive an ancient enemy into extinction. Following the victory against smallpox, Guinea worm is likely to be the next disease in the history of mankind to be eradicated from the Earth.

Monday June 14, 2010 1:00pm - 1:45pm
Embassy Film Theatre

1:00pm

Working with Faith Organizations and Networks to Achieve the MDGs
Moving from the early beginnings in missionary and humanitarian programs to full partnership in today's major global health efforts, faith-based programs now range from direct service delivery to serving as major implementers of Global Fund, PEPFAR, RBM and other large public health programs, whether they are implemented by FBOs or secular organizations. As all global health programs are now charged to demonstrate measurable impact on reducing mortality and morbidity and contributing to meeting the MDGs, the role of monitoring progress towards program objectives and evaluating best practices and lessons learned has become central to their work. Panelists from several different faith and professional backgrounds will present results from some of these programs, their perspectives on the role of religious organizations and networks in achieving these results, as share their experiences integrating professional public health evaluation practices into their organization. Session is open to everyone Please join us for what is sure to be a stimulating discussion! Contact: jean_capps@hotmail.com.
http://www.globalhealth.org/view_top.php3?id=604#faith

Monday June 14, 2010 1:00pm - 3:00pm
Empire Ballroom

1:00pm

Careers in Global Health: How We Got Started
Learn more about careers in global health from senior-level professionals. Prominent global health figures will describe the unique characteristics of their field and how and why they got started in global health.

Monday June 14, 2010 1:00pm - 3:00pm
Ambassador Ballroom

1:00pm

W4, Part II: Let Us Walk you Through Designing your Health Care Improvement Project!
Limited Capacity seats available

The workshop is aimed at enabling participants to design their own improvement project applying the principles of modern health care improvement to the participant's area of choice.The workshop will provide an overview to the principles and methods of health care improvement. It aims at developing participants' knowledge and skills in the principles and methods of modern health care improvement, including aim-setting, indicator development, process analysis, and developing tests of change using plan-do-study-act cycles for implementing improvement interventions. It will contain a series of short plenary presentations and small group exercises, as well as plenary discussions, Q&A, and reflection. Examples of improvements achieved in different areas of care in developing country settings will be given throughout the workshop.This workshop will allow participants to design their own QI project with hands-on guidance from HCI field and headquarters staff. The main steps in designing an improvement project will be discussed, followed by small group work assisted by HCI facilitators to allow participants to apply the principles to design an improvement project based on a real priority for improvement they have identified. The example used in the workshop will be based on the Framework for Improving Care for Patients on Antiretroviral Theapy. However, participants will be able to chose an example of their own to design their improvement project during the day.

Monday June 14, 2010 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Blue Room

1:00pm

W5: Logic Models: Platform for Monitoring & Evaluation Planning, Implementation, and Use of Findings
Limited Capacity seats available

Logic models are used to describe important components of a program and link activities to intended outcomes. For the purposes of monitoring and evaluation, a wellconstructed logic model directly informs the selection of specific questions to be addressed; discussion of data needs; and translation of findings to real-world recommendations for improvement. The workshop addresses two key questions:
(1) What are the hallmarks of a well-constructed, scientifically-sound, and useful logic model?
(2) How do we maximize the use of high-quality logic models for monitoring and evaluation planning, implementation and use of findings?

Monday June 14, 2010 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Hampton Ballroom

1:00pm

W6: Scaling up with the Endpoint in Mind: What every Program Should Consider in Terms of Principles
This workshop is designed to: 1) Orient participants to models and principles for scaling up 2) Provide a set of principles for choosing scaling up strategies and planning scale up from the beginning of a pilot program 3) Provide guidance on monitoring and evaluating processes of taking a program or service to scale Description: At some point in their career, most people and organizations get involved in scaling up programs or services and expend significant time, energy, and resources in the process. Too often, though, little reflection is given to theory-based models of change and defining measurable outcomes of success. At different stages in scaling up processes, decisions of those guiding scale up will lead to (or not) achieving sustainable results. Using an interactive, case-study based approach, this workshop will provide an overview of critical issues - programmatic and measurement - to consider to assure your organization's scaling up efforts are successful and sustainable.

Monday June 14, 2010 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Executive Room

1:00pm

Research Track Workshop: Using LiST to Estimate Impact of Scaling Up Interventions for MNCH
Limited Capacity seats available

The workshop will begin by giving a brief background of LiST, focusing on the processes used to develop the model and assumptions. Next it will provide an overview of the software and its outputs. This portion of the workshop will primarily be lecture, with time for some questions. During the next two hours the workshop will focus on having participants use LiST to answer specific questions. During this period we will use multiple facilitators to ensure that all of the participants can progress. During the last hour of the workshop we will try to have discussion among the group about problems and issues using LiST and based on feedback will also ask participants to answer more in-depth using LiST.

Monday June 14, 2010 1:00pm - 4:30pm
Congressional Room

1:30pm

District Level Malaria Advocacy: Scaling Up Malaria Control Through Partnerships
A panel of international experts from the public and private sector will stimulate discussion on how district-level advocacy teams can speed the scale up of malaria control in sub-Saharan Africa. The discussion will highlight a Voices for a Malaria-Free Future project that has mobilized the creation of District Malaria Advocacy Teams (DMATs) in Ghana, Tanzania, Mali, and Uganda. DMATs consist of a diverse group of leaders from the District Health Management Team, religious institutions, the government, the private sector, and traditional chiefs. Panelists will discuss opportunities and challenges associated with the DMATs, as well as the successes that have led to greater transparency in government and expanded malaria control coverage.

www.malariafreefuture.org

Monday June 14, 2010 1:30pm - 3:30pm
Capitol Room

2:00pm

Policy Track/Special Session: Costs & Choices: How to Pay Mounting Cost of Global AIDS Response
Over the past five years, the world has made tremendous progress in fighting AIDS - but at the same time costs of the response are skyrocketing and threaten to rise to as much as $30 billion a year, precisely at a time when funding is becoming tight because of the economic recession and competing priorities such as global warming. This raises a series of difficult questions that senior officials from the most affected countries and their international funding partners must urgently answer: How much money will be needed to fight AIDS in the coming years? How big is the price tag for an effective program of prevention, treatment, and orphan care? How can governments in low- and middle-income countries spend their money smarter on AIDS, in order to bring down the number of new infections and extend life-saving treatment? What can be done to make AIDS spending more efficient? Who will pay for AIDS programs in the most affected countries over the next decade? What is the appropriate share of the financing burden for national governments, donors, NGOs, and others? The session will begin with a short overview of the main findings of the report of the aids2031 Costs and Financing task force "Cost and Choices,"

Monday June 14, 2010 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Palladian Ballroom

2:00pm

Can Country Ownership Work? Field Perspectives on Health Systems Strengthening
Have doubts about country ownership? Want to hear more? Civil society and health ministries in developing countries have experience with a multitude of donor approaches, from disease-specific initiatives to health system strengthening to direct budget support. Currently, global health donors are seeking to increase country ownership: in the US Global Health Initiative, the Global Fund's transition to a Global Health Fund, and the creation of the International Health Partnership. Come listen to former Minister of Health Francisco Songane of Mozambique, Dr. Sin Somuny of MEDICAM in Cambodia, and others share their personal experiences. Tough questions welcomed.

www.msh.org

Monday June 14, 2010 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Governors Room

2:00pm

Crossing the Divide: Reaching the Poor with Commercial Health Networks and Franchises
USAID's Strengthening Health Outcomes through the Private Sector (SHOPS) Project will host an Auxiliary Session, Crossing the Divide: Reaching the Poor with Commercial Health Networks and Franchises on Monday, June 14th from 2-4pm in the Diplomat Ballroom. In recent years new business models have emerged that have allowed commercial health networks and franchises to better meet the health needs of those residing at the base of the economic pyramid. This panel discussion will showcase a range of examples and highlight challenges, results and lessons learned.

Monday June 14, 2010 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Diplomat Ballroom

2:30pm

Film Series: Youth Zones
In conflicts and natural disasters around the world, young people, at a crucial state of their development, are faced with numerous challenges and difficulties. Emergencies often steal their adolescence and force them to undertake adult responsibilities. The structures and institutions that should guarantee their secure, peaceful development-schools, family, community and health centers-are often broken down, leaving them with little, if any, support, and sometimes in charge of others. Access to basic sexual and reproductive health services, including information on STIs and HIV/AIDS, is often impossible and further ignored by humanitarian efforts. Yet in the midst of these great difficulties, young people raise their younger siblings, form youth groups/organizations, put food on the table for their families, conduct peer education activities contribute to peace movements, galvanize their communities and contribute in numerous other ways to positive changes. Crucial as these stories are, most of them are never told. Youth Zones documents the voices of young people affected by conflict and natural disaster. Emmy-award winning filmmaker, Lisa Russell, accompanied by spoken word poet, Luke Nephew, and youth activist, Chernor Bah, facilitated discussions and conducted creative writing and poetry workshops with youth from Liberia, Colombia, Lebanon, Northern Uganda and New Orleans. Youth Zones profiles youth who work as educators, peace activists, healthcare assistants and drama mentors in an effort to rehabilitate their communities after emergencies.
The film screening will be followed by Q&A with filmmaker Lisa Russell and a poetry performance by Safia Elhillo.

Monday June 14, 2010 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Embassy Film Theatre

3:00pm

Exhibition Hall Set up
Exhibitor Set Up Only, NOT Open to Conference Attendees Yet

Monday June 14, 2010 3:00pm - 7:00pm
Exhibition Hall

3:30pm

Volunteer Networking
Monday June 14, 2010 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Empire Ballroom

4:00pm

Plenary: The Millennium Development Goals: Where are we now and what must be done to succeed?
A combination of voices from the North and South to review progress on the MDGs and to discuss what is working and what is not; what innovations are needed; how partnerships need to be formed; and how governments, both developed and developing, need to work together to achieve the MDGs. These are the issues that the community is talking about this year, particularly because of the UN MDG Review Summit in September when the Goals and progress-to-date will be assessed, and a plan will be created for achieving the MDGs by 2015.

Monday June 14, 2010 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Regency Ballroom

5:30pm

Abt International Health Reception
Abt Associates' International Health Division will host a reception at which experts in health policy, systems strengthening, program implementation, and the private sector will share and exchange experiences on collaborating to improve community health in developing countries.
Refreshments will be served and all conference attendees are welcome.
http://www.abtassociates.com/

Monday June 14, 2010 5:30pm - 7:30pm
Palladian Ballroom

5:30pm

Maximizing Nutritional Benefits from Agricultural Interventions
Maximizing Nutritional Benefits from Agricultural Interventions This seminar will present a procedure for assessing the likely impact of agricultural interventions on the most nutritionally vulnerable populations. Participants will learn about identifying aspects of interventions to monitor for indications that adverse nutritional impact is occurring or likely will occur. Participants will test drive the procedure using examples of actual projects. Increases in agricultural production do not always lead to positive nutritional impact. To achieve maximal nutritional benefit, agricultural interventions should have positive (or at least neutral) impacts on the food security of nutritionally marginalized groups, and additionally must a) increase access of these groups to nutritionally beneficial crops and products, and b) be coupled with nutrition counseling activities. Importantly, unintended negative consequences for nutritionally marginalized groups need careful consideration, such as potential increases in women's workload that may negatively impact child feeding.
http://www.iycn.org/

Monday June 14, 2010 5:30pm - 7:30pm
Capitol Room

6:00pm

From Diagnostic Technologies to Diagnosis in the Field
Why do we need better diagnostics? Join us to learn about the development of new diagnostic tools, to share different experiences of how they can be used in endemic countries, and to discuss how better diagnostics can support other in-country disease management efforts and programs. Chaired by the CEO of FIND, Giorgio Roscigno, and introduced by James Kakooza, the Minister of State for Health (Public Health Care), Uganda, this symposium will first highlight the current state of research in diagnostics for tuberculosis, malaria and sleeping sickness, drawing on the diverse experiences of FIND staff members (Gerd Michel, Senior Technology Officer, Joseph Ndung'u, Head of HAT Diagnostics Program, and Evan Lee, Senior Policy Officer). The second part of the symposium will focus on the experiences of FIND partners in rolling out diagnostics in countries, advocacy activities in the field, and in the strengthening of laboratories. Presenters will include Tsehaynesh Messele (Director General, Ethiopian Health and Nutrition Research Institute), John Kabayo (Coordinator, African Union's Pan African Tsetse and Trypanosomiasis Eradication Campaign), John Nkengasong (Associate Director for Laboratory Science, Centers for Disease Control) and Jorge Bermudez (Executive Secretary, UNITAID).

www.finddiagnostics.org

Monday June 14, 2010 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Governors Room

6:00pm

Real Collaboration: What It Takes for Global Health to Succeed Book Launch
In global health there is a compelling need for what we call real collaboration, the give-and-take of human beings who are so dedicated to a mission they will set aside the politics of organizations, share the difficulties, and invent solutions together. Yet, collaborations in global health often fall short of what they hope to achieve. The difficulty comes in translating the attitude and concept of collaboration into concrete applications. The Task Force for Global Health with the support of Milbank Memorial Fund is excited to invite participants to the book launch of Real Collaboration: What It Takes for Global Health to Succeed. Essential reading for those who work in global health, this practical handbook focuses on what might be the most important lesson of the last fifty years: that collaboration is the best way to make health resources count for disadvantaged people around the world. Designed as a learning resource to catalyze fresh thinking, Real Collaboration draws from case studies of teams struggling to combat smallpox, river blindness, polio, and other health threats. In honest appraisals, participants share their missteps as well as their successes. Based on these stories, as well as on analyses of many other enterprises, this accessible, engaging book distills the critical factors that can increase the likelihood of success for those who are launching or managing a new partnership. The reception attendees will be able to learn more about the book and the principles it presents directly from two of its authors, Mark Rosenberg and Elisabeth Hayes.
http://www.taskforce.org/

Monday June 14, 2010 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Executive Room

6:30pm

Delivering Sustainable Health Solutions Worldwide
Project HOPE has been a leader in developing and implementing health care solutions to challenges worldwide for more than 50 years. HOPE's innovative, long-term solutions have influenced the health of people and health systems in more than 100 countries. HOPE President and CEO John P. Howe III, M.D., and members of the HOPE staff from around the world will share their insights about the organization's proven results in a panel discussion that will be moderated by Susan Dentzer, Editor-in-Chief of Health Affairs. Reception to follow panel discussion. To RSVP, email dboylan@projecthope.org.

www.projecthope.org

Monday June 14, 2010 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Hampton Ballroom

6:30pm

Health Metrics Network
THIS EVENT IS BY INVITATION ONLY
Monday June 14, 2010 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Diplomat Ballroom

6:30pm

The ACCESS Family Planning Program: Learning About Effective Approaches for Postpartum Family Planning
The ACCESS Family Planning Program: Learning About Effective Approaches for Postpartum Family Planning ACCESS Family Planning Program representatives from Bangladesh, Kenya and Nigeria will share key areas of learning in the implementation of postpartum family planning approaches guided by evidence-based practices. These presentations will include community and facility-based strategies for reaching women and their families with family planning information and services in the first year postpartum. Global lessons learned in the integration of family planning into maternal and newborn health programs will also be presented.

http://www.accesstohealth.org/program/ppfp.htm

Monday June 14, 2010 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Congressional Room

6:30pm

Walk the Talk: Investing to Solve the Health Workforce Crisis to Reach the MDGs and Save Lives
Walk the Talk: Investing to Solve the Health Workforce Crisis to Reach the MDGs and Save Lives Density and management skills of HRH, particularly community health workers, nurses, midwives, and doctors, significantly affect maternal, infant and under-five mortality rates. Thirty-nine countries in Africa have not met the minimum threshold of 2.3 health professionals per 1,000 population to very likely achieve the MDGs and Africa alone is short some 1 million health workers. The severe HRH shortage is attributed to many factors, including under-investment in health systems and HRH. Only recently have global initiatives like PEPFAR and the Global Fund fully recognized and supported HSS. If the MDGs are to be achieved, an actionable way forward is required to develop needs-based targets for scaling-up HRH with commensurate funding. This session will discuss proposals to solve the HRH crisis, including adequate HRH financing, HRH internal and external migration and the need to further strengthen various global health initiatives.
Food and beverages served.
http://www.amref.org/

Monday June 14, 2010 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Empire Ballroom

7:30pm

Student/Young Professional Networking Reception
Connect with your peers at the Student and Young Professional Networking Reception, co-hosted by GlobeMed and the GHC, and get involved with some of the leading global health student organizations.

Monday June 14, 2010 7:30pm - 9:30pm
Blue Room

12:00am

 
Tuesday, June 15
 

8:00am

International Exhibition Grand Opening Breakfast Reception
The official grand opening of the International Exhibition begins on an eye-opening note with a breakfast reception. Explore our exhibitors' array of programs, products and services in an informal and fun atmosphere.

Tuesday June 15, 2010 8:00am - 9:00am
Exhibition Hall

8:00am

Exhibition Hall Open
Grand Opening Breakfast Reception: 8-9 am

Tuesday June 15, 2010 8:00am - 4:00pm
Exhibition Hall

8:00am

The Global Marketplace
The Global Marketplace will highlight the sustaining benefits of community-based Global Health and humanitarian affairs projects. Participants in the Global Marketplace will be able to highlight their products and services to conference attendees. Additionally, through the Global Marketplace, conference attendees can purchase handicrafts directly from developing country organizations or organizations working with developing country communities operating under the principles of fair trade.

Tuesday June 15, 2010 8:00am - 4:00pm
Exhibition Hall

8:00am

8:30am

Helping Babies Breathe - Hands-on Introduction for MCH Experts
THIS EVENT IS BY INVITATION ONLY
Tuesday June 15, 2010 8:30am - 10:30am
Palladian Ballroom

9:00am

Plenary: How Has the Increase in Global Health Resources Had a Positive Impact on Health?
Substantial resources are being directed towards increasing the effective coverage of interventions to improve population health. In order to measure an intervention's effect, we must track in a valid, reliable and comparable way, the coverage and effective coverage of the intervention. This session will look at the effective coverage of interventions - insecticide-treated bednets, ARVs, and skilled birth attendants - to illustrate the importance of measuring effective coverage and discuss some of the methods being used for this purpose. Following from the flow of financial resources to the funding and tracking of health interventions, this session will conclude by addressing the impact of these resources and interventions on key health outcomes such as those targeted by the Millennium Development Goals. It will delve into what we really know about success in global health given increased resources, and what that might tell us about how we should pursue activities in the future. It will emphasize how measurement helps us to establish an evidence-base for progress in health, and how that can be used to help improve all of our efforts, no matter what sector we are from or individual role we may play.

Tuesday June 15, 2010 9:00am - 10:30am
Regency Ballroom

10:45am

Educating Nurses for Global Citizenship: Critical Perspectives in Global Health
Globalization presents nurses with the challenge and ethical responsibility of being competent caregivers for a global community. Global health and global citizenship are seldom core components of nursing curriculum and, far too frequent, nurses are educated as if they would remain in the same place and serve a homogeneous population for the rest of their careers. This presentation will illustrate the possibilities and challenges of undertaking curricular changes to integrate global health in the curriculum at the LSB Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto.

Tuesday June 15, 2010 10:45am - 11:15am
Exhibition Hall

10:45am

Special Session/Policy Track: The CSIS Commission on Smart Global Health Policy Report
On March 18, 2010, after almost a year of deliberation, the Center for Strategic & International Studies launched the final report of the CSIS Commission on Smart Global Health Policy, A Healthier, Safer, and More Prosperous World, laying out a long-term strategic vision for U.S. engagement in global health. Members of the diverse Commission will review the recommendations and solicit opinion from the GHC membership on how to carry forward this agenda into the future.

Tuesday June 15, 2010 10:45am - 12:30pm
Blue Room

10:45am

Research Track: The Global Health Council's Research Agenda: A Look Back at the Past Year and Ahead

Over the past year, the Global Health Council's Research and Analysis Department has highlighted several new initiatives. Our work on the integration of maternal, newborn, child and reproductive health has focused on how service integration can be accomplished. Our work on the intersection of trade and health has focused on producing a booklet and a series of briefs that provide basic information about how trade agreements work and how they related to global health. Our work on cancer has focused on understanding how cancer programming is implemented in developing countries. Finally, the Department has engaged in a university tour across five regions of the United States to reach out to academia and forge new partnerships with the Council.

In addition to examining these issues, we will look ahead to what is coming up next at the Council. One potential avenue for new work includes Global Health Delivery's GHDonline.org Communities: Connecting Practice, Research, and Policy.

Launched in July 2008 by the Global Health Delivery Project, GHDonline (http://www.ghdonline.org) is a Virtual Professional Collaboration platform where global health implementers engage in problem-solving and share information resources to improve the delivery of health care worldwide and in resource-limited settings. GHDonline is structured in communities, each focusing on specific global health challenges from adherence and retention in care to tuberculosis infection control, and moderated by experts.

Thousands of implementers, from clinicians to government employees and researchers, from 1000+ organizations in 130+ countries are collaborating in GHDonline communities, in effect connecting practice, research, and policy. In this presentation, we will demonstrate GHDonline and showcase several in-depth discussions that have yielded results and inspired various stakeholders as a new tool for the Global Health Council to further its mission and work.

http://www.ghdonline.org/

Tuesday June 15, 2010 10:45am - 12:30pm
Capitol Room

10:45am

A1: Improving Community-based Programs in Maternal Health
Presenters Discuss:
the role of community level providers in addressing unmet need for contraception and increasing access to Long Acting Family Planning (LAFP) methods (Ethiopia); experiences in scaling up community based access to injectables and scale up issues and themes to consider when developing a plan to scale up community based provision of injectables (Uganda, Madagascar, Kenya, Nigeria, Zambia, Malawi and Rwanda); the feasibility of implementing a midwifery focused model for training of ANMs/Staff Nurses as per the GOI SBA guidelines and technical support to MoHFW on implementation of skilled birth attendant training (India); and three ways in which Home Based Life Saving Skills supports Community Evacuation Committees (Haiti).

Tuesday June 15, 2010 10:45am - 12:30pm
Ambassador Ballroom

10:45am

A2: Helping Babies get to One
Presenters Discuss:
the role of light emitting diodes (LED) phototherapy in reducing neonatal mortality/morbidity in Vietnam, and the implications for wider distribution to other developing countries (Vietnam); an educational program designed to equip birth attendants with knowledge and skills to provide neonatal resuscitation in resource-limited settings; the need for Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) in the care of neonates in the developing world, and the factors contributing to successful implementation in one country (Southeast Asia); and the potential benefits of community based delivery of gentamicin in the Uniject® device (gentamicin Uniject) for the management of newborn infections (Nepal).

Tuesday June 15, 2010 10:45am - 12:30pm
Congressional Room

10:45am

A3: Using Effective Health Policy Tools for Greater Impact
Presenters Discuss:
components of effective policy implementation and a tool that assesses implementation barriers and supports policy dialogue and advocacy (Multiple country examples); the process Viet Nam has undertaken in drafting a law concerning medical licensing (Viet Nam); Nigeria's experience using a decision tool to synthesize strategic information in an HIV policy model to project resource needs and inform strategic planning for HIV/AIDS services and the challenges of costing HIV service delivery and the use of decision support tools in a policy process (Nigeria).

Tuesday June 15, 2010 10:45am - 12:30pm
Executive Room

10:45am

A4: What's Standing in the Way? Barriers to Voluntary Counseling and Testing
Presenters Discuss:
the factors in generating high HIV counseling and testing demand and acceptance in a conservative, Somali ethnicity, Islamic context (East Africa); a methodology for conducting survey research with a highly mobile, most at risk population, street youth's barriers to accessing HIV testing and treatment, and the key needs of street youth in Ukraine for mitigating their risk behaviors and linking them into HIV prevention, treatment, and care (Kyiv, Odesa, and Donetsk, Ukraine); and how mobile HIV counseling and testing services (MCT) in Ethiopia reached key populations at risk through partnership with local communities, and how effective the MCT service has been in reaching populations at higher risk for HIV infection (Ethiopia).

Tuesday June 15, 2010 10:45am - 12:30pm
Empire Ballroom

10:45am

A5: The Metrics of Impact Investing in Health
Presenters Discuss:
the emergence of the impact investing industry, including providing a definition of impact investing, discussing the phase of its development as a distinct industry, the demand from investors for social returns and relevance to and implications for the health sector; how the Africa Healthcare Fund (AHF) team will invest capital, monitor its portfolio holdings, and report out its social return performance results and the challenges of designing a program that is relevant to an investment process, inexpensive to manage, and consistent with the needs of an investor who wants to see quantifiable measures of social change; clear examples of scalable healthcare investment and market opportunities in Africa that have a positive return on investment; and social investment fund managers' efforts to push performance management capabilities into the investments they fund and new initiatives by the impact investing community to standardize performance data so as to measure broad based social and economic returns, in this case, for the health sector.

Tuesday June 15, 2010 10:45am - 12:30pm
Hampton Ballroom

10:45am

A6: Integration: Getting Results and Reaching Goals
Presenters Discuss:
how village community banking can be a sustainable response to the economic hardships faced by people living with HIV/AIDS and their community home based care providers (Tanzania); findings from a four year initiative with five microfinance institutions that implemented and evaluated the impact of integrated health services on client health and financial security, and how to access technical guides and other resources to support replication (West Africa, South Asia, Southeast Asia, Latin America); the advantages of using established delivery models with health and business metrics, such as microfinance, to offer health services in a socially impactful, measurable, and financially sustainable way (Nicaragua); and the advantages of holistic, integrated health development efforts (Ethiopia, urban areas)

Tuesday June 15, 2010 10:45am - 12:30pm
Governors Room

11:00am

The Joint Action Plan for Women's and Children's Health - Innovation and Partnerships for Success
Women and children are central to development, yet efforts to achieve Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) relating to their health have fallen short of expectations. The United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon is leading a global effort to accelerate progress on women's and children's health through the development of a Joint Action Plan.
The Joint Action Plan for Women's and Children's Health builds on existing agreements and commitments, and challenges all actors to intensify their efforts to improve the health of women and children and achieve the health-related MDGs.
This consultation session at the Global Health Council Conference will introduce the Joint Action Plan and invite comments from a wide range of partners, including governments, UN, NGOs, health care professionals, donors and the private sector.

Tuesday June 15, 2010 11:00am - 12:00pm
Embassy Room

11:00am

Special Session: What Is the Impact of Better Information on Health Outcomes?
Better decisions about healthcare strategies demand better information. Many national health information systems are not currently equipped to handle policy decisions and are ill-prepared to meet future requirements. This session will be a dialogue concerning the essential contribution that a health information system enables and how to encourage governments to include explicit strategies for system development when preparing health strategies.

Tuesday June 15, 2010 11:00am - 12:30pm
Regency Ballroom

11:30am

Osteopathic Medicine on the Global Stage
Osteopathic medical education places a strong emphasis on primary medical care. Approximately 60% of osteopathic physicians (DOs) choose to practice in the areas of family medicine, internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, and pediatrics. Osteopathic medical schools have long been filling the void for medical education in rural and other medically underserved areas. Since 2006, five new osteopathic medical schools have opened. These medical schools are well positioned to help remedy the projected physician shortage by bringing health care services to some of our nation's traditionally underserved regions, including Appalachia, the Pacific Northwest and Harlem, N.Y.
www.osteopathic.org

Tuesday June 15, 2010 11:30am - 12:00pm
Exhibition Hall

12:45pm

Book Chat: Inside the Outbreaks: The Elite Medical Detectives of the Epidemic Intelligence Service
Since its founding in 1951, the Epidemic Intelligence Service has waged war on every imaginable ailment. When an epidemic hits, the EIS will be there to crack the case, however mysterious or deadly, saving countless lives in the process. Over the years they have successfully battled polio, cholera, and smallpox, to name a few, and in recent years have turned to the epidemics killing us now--smoking, obesity, and gun violence among them. The successful EIS model has spread internationally: former EIS officers on the staff of the Centers for Disease Control have helped to establish nearly thirty similar programs around the world. EIS veterans have gone on to become leaders in the world of public health in organizations such as the World Health Organization. Inside the Outbreaks takes readers on a riveting journey through the history of this remarkable organization, following Epidemic Intelligence Service officers on their globetrotting quest to eliminate the most lethal and widespread threats to the world's health.

Tuesday June 15, 2010 12:45pm - 1:30pm
Exhibition Hall

12:45pm

Luncheon: Tuberculosis and Women's Health: Lessons of Survival and Advocacy from South Africa and the US
Auxiliary Luncheon: Tuberculosis and Women's Health: Lessons of Survival and Advocacy from South Africa and the US Under the umbrella of the Global Health Initiative (GHI), the US establishes a common framework for global health and aims to enhance coordination among US global health programs through a health systems strengthening and women-centered approach. This session will discuss women and tuberculosis (TB) as part of a broad women's health agenda. In addition, the session will examine the state of advocacy on TB, specifically goals and metrics related to advocacy and what can be done to increase awareness of this disease that takes the lives of 4,500 each day. Come hear the compelling story and TB survival experience of International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies Global TB Advocate Ms. Gerry Elsdon, who will be accompanied by expert panelists in the areas of advocacy and global health.

Tuesday June 15, 2010 12:45pm - 2:15pm
Palladian Ballroom

1:00pm

Career Session/Book Chat: Caring for the World: A Guidebook to Global Health Opportunities
There will be a discussion on how to find and select global health opportunities for physicians, other medical personal and students alike. There will be discussion on how to find organizations that are looking for assistance in your field global health and how to make an informed decision on how to choose one.

Tuesday June 15, 2010 1:00pm - Monday June 14, 2010 2:00pm
Hampton Ballroom

1:00pm

Film Series: Call to Life
Pakistan Initiative for Mothers and Newborns (PAIMAIN) is a six-year USAID-funded project implemented in 24 districts by a consortium led by JSI. PAIMAN is designed to reduce maternal, newborn and child mortality in Pakistan and address issues of family planning. Muslim religious scholars (Ulama) intervention, implemented by JHU-CCP, a consortium partner, has been a key building-block for PAIMAN. This unique intervention is implemented through a strategy that was chalked out by Ulama themselves. A Central Committee of influential Ulama is spearheading the project. Call to Life, a 13-minute documentary, primarily highlights the potential of Ulama in improving MNCH situation especially in hard to reach areas of the country. The documentary emphasizes the importance of Ulama as a medium for behavior change communication by assuring that religion and development can go hand-in-hand. An impact evaluation of this intervention affirms that the level of knowledge among respondents exposed to health messages by Ulama was generally 25% higher than those who were not exposed.

Tuesday June 15, 2010 1:00pm - 1:45pm
Embassy Film Theatre

1:00pm

Policy Track: Advocacy Day and Reception

Advocacy Day is back at the GHC conference! You will have an opportunity to showcase your organizations' work and discuss the importance of global health with your Members of Congress during this year's conference. We will devote an afternoon to meetings on Capitol Hill. The purpose of these meetings are to introduce yourselves and your organization to key congressional offices, show them that global health programs work, bring your knowledge and expertise to Capitol Hill, and learn more about Congressional interest areas in global health.

Directly following the Advocacy meetings the Global Health Council's President and CEO Dr. Jeffrey L. Sturchio will present Congressional Awards to Global Health Champions at a reception on Capitol Hill. GHC is also honored to welcome keynote speakers to the reception, including Gerry Elsdon, South African celebrity advocate and survivor of tuberculosis. Join us for this occasion to network with key Congressional representatives and public health professionals while enjoying fine cocktails and hors d'oeuvres to conclude Advocacy Day.

1-1:45 PM: Policy Talking Points - Blue Room, Omni Shoreham Hotel

1:45 PM: Buses to Capitol Hill Leave

2:30-4:30 PM: Hill Meetings - Capitol Hill

5-7 PM: Congressional Awards and Reception - Senate Visitors Center 203/202, Capitol Hill

Advocacy Day is open to all registered conference attendees. Please RSVP by June 9 with your name, organizational affiliation, State and Congressional district (if applicable), and contact e-mail address.

Tuesday June 15, 2010 1:00pm - 7:00pm
Blue Room

1:45pm

Book Chat/Discussion with One of the Authors of the Book Real Collaboration: What It Takes for Global Health to Succeed
In global health there is a compelling need for what we call real collaboration, the give-and-take of human beings who are so dedicated to a mission they will set aside the politics of organizations, share the difficulties, and invent solutions together. The presentation will discuss obstacles that get in the way of effective collaboration as well as some of the key ingredients that greatly increase the likelihood that a global health coalition or partnership will be successful. The Task Force for Global Health recently completed 5 years of research on the critical factors that can increase the likelihood of success for those who are launching or managing a new partnership and has published these findings in the book, Real Collaboration: What It Takes for Global Health to Succeed. The discussion and the book catalyze fresh thinking, drawing from case studies of teams struggling to combat smallpox, river blindness, polio, and other health threats.
www.taskforce.org

Tuesday June 15, 2010 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Exhibition Hall

2:30pm

Research Track: Raising Awareness of Cancer in Developing Countries

This session will highlight the challenges posed by the growing burden of cancer in developing countries and featuring some initiatives to address these challenges.
Participants should be able to
Describe some of the main challenges of cancer in developing countries and some initiatives to address these challenges. Understand the policy/advocacy and research agendas related to cancer in developing countries.

Presentations:
Listening to GHC Members: Report out on the Global Health Council's Cancer Control Learning and Advocacy Initiative. The Initiative has several components, including focus groups conducted with key stakeholders at GHC's 2009 International Conference, a literature review, a survey of GHC members, two cancer related events on understanding cancer and barriers to cancer control in developing countries, and a series of working group meetings. The take-home message will be highlighting the cancer research and policy agendas.

Using Technology and Social Media to Support Patient Advocacy. The internet and new social media tools provide many opportunities for engagement. For people dealing with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) -- whether patients, patient groups, caregivers or healthcare professionals -- CML Earth is a global interactive social network dedicated to connecting the CML community from around the world. This session will present a demonstration of CML Earth, a global program that allows CML patients to connect with each other all over the world.

Responding to the Growing Problem of Tobacco Use. The need for effective tobacco control in developing countries is growing daily, as tobacco products are proliferated around the world. With effective messages and policies, progress can be made to stem the expansion and use of tobacco, and prevent cancer and other tobacco-related diseases. American Cancer Society uses evidence-based strategies to curb the use and subsequent harmful effects of tobacco through powerful advocacy campaigns. This presentation will offer visuals and engaging methods for mobilizing media, youth, and other players for effective campaigns.

Tuesday June 15, 2010 2:30pm - 4:15pm
Capitol Room

2:30pm

B1: Modeling the Potential Impact of an AIDS Vaccine
Presenters Discuss:
how modeling the potential impact of an AIDS vaccine can help policymakers and advocates make better decisions about the importance of sustaining commitment to research and developing strategies for eventual rollout and access (Kenya and Uganda); the results of a study modeling the impact of AIDS vaccines of various efficacy and under different rollout scenarios in Brazil, and an overview of how these modeling results can be useful to policymakers in understanding partial efficacy, targeted vaccination strategies, prioritizing prevention research and considering future access issues (Brazil); and how computer simulation and modeling tools such as the Spectrum Package can be used to model the impact of an AIDS vaccine and assist policymakers in preparing for the introduction of new prevention technologies that are still in development, the Spectrum package and the vaccine module and the key assumptions underlying the model (Global).

Tuesday June 15, 2010 2:30pm - 4:15pm
Ambassador Ballroom

2:30pm

B2: Models for Improving Metrics in Global Health
Presenters Discuss:
trends in contraceptive security over time at the national, regional, and global level, measures used to identify priority areas for additional support and program planning, and how measures can be used to advocate for improved resource allocation by country governments, global donors, and lenders (Global); key relationships between health drivers and outcomes, potential health futures and opportunities for creating change (Global); gaps and issues related to indicators for measuring health systems strengthening (HSS) and the opportunities for moving toward an international consensus (Global); and the costs and benefits of meeting needs for family planning and for maternal and newborn health care in developing countries and key similarities and differences in needs and impacts between major geographic regions (Sub Saharan Africa, South Central and Southeastern Asia and Latin America, Caribbean)

Tuesday June 15, 2010 2:30pm - 4:15pm
Congressional Room

2:30pm

B3: Community Approaches to Meeting Health Goals: Lessons from South Asia
Presenters Discuss:
factors of a successful community based primary health care program and how comprehensive CBPHC is effective in meeting MDGs 1-7 (rural India); identify contributions of health management committees to better maternal and child health services, how communities partner with the public health sector to improve health services and successful interventions to build the capacity of health management committees (Districts Mansehra and Bagh, Pakistan); the Volunteer Investment and Value Audit (VIVA) concept and tools to assess volunteers involvement and the return from the volunteers on ongoing health programs; and best practices employed by Urban Health Resource Centre (UHRC) to increase access to maternal and child health services for the urban poor through women's health groups and community link volunteers (Agra, India).

Tuesday June 15, 2010 2:30pm - 4:15pm
Executive Room

2:30pm

B5: Progress in Reproductive Health: Including a Man's Perspective
Presenters Discuss:
how integrating gender and sexuality can contribute to improvements in factors that influence maternal health outcomes (Asia, India); CARE's systematic approach to addressing sexual and gender inequalities in Asia using a social ecological model (Asia); the principal components of a successful reproductive health program for men, strategies used to recruit and engage men in reproductive health programs, and the challenges and successes of an innovative program for men (Guatemala); and the main elements and advantages of a successful workplace male involvement approach (Sub Saharan Africa).

Tuesday June 15, 2010 2:30pm - 4:15pm
Hampton Ballroom

2:30pm

B6: Surgical Metrics: Unmet Surgical Need and Impact on Global Health
Presenters Discuss:
the importance of surgical care in child health in low and middle income countries and ongoing efforts to improve pediatric surgical care in settings of limited resources (Low and middle income countries); Health Metrics, Outcomes analysis, Disability and premature death, Role of interventions in Disability and Premature death, the role of surgical interventions in Global Burden of Disease (GBD) (Low and Middle Income Countries); the burden of traumatic conditions faced by lay first responders in a low income country with no organized emergency system, the development of a basic context appropriate curriculum for lay first responders, and the effectiveness and scalability of such a program (Uganda, Sub Saharan Africa); and the application of surgical metrics to evaluate the impact of surgical intervention on the low and middle income populations (Low and Middle Income Countries)

Tuesday June 15, 2010 2:30pm - 4:15pm
Governors Room

2:30pm

Symposium: Nurses and Midwives: A Vital Part of the Maternal Health Workforce
This symposium, a collaboration of the Global Health Council, Conference Co-chair Dr. Sheila Tlou, the American College of Nurse-Midwives and the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, will bring together nurses, midwives and all those working in maternal health. The interactive dialogue will focus on two issues: 1) What do nurses and midwives in developing and developed countries want from each other? 2) What educational opportunities (or lack thereof) exist for midwives from other countries in the United States, and what student clinical placements exist globally for U.S. midwifery students interested in global health careers? We welcome the participation of attendees from the ACNM conference at this symposium.

Tuesday June 15, 2010 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Diplomat Ballroom

2:30pm

B4: Health Systems Building Blocks: How to Build Strong Health Systems that Deliver Quality Services
Presenters Discuss:
the use of service delivery as an entry point to health systems strengthening and the added value of Quality Improvement to traditional public health programs (Senegal); how health governance contributes to system strengthening and what indicators can be used to measure health governance (global); two innovative strategies to health financing and how to support the implementation of the strategies (Africa); different methodologies and tools used to assess pharmaceutical and health commodity systems and how monitoring tools developed in support of antiretroviral therapy (ART) programs have been expanded for wider use; how Human Resources Management (HRM) system strengthening is critical for the support of workforce development, and contributes to overall health system strengthening (Africa with global applicability); and Health Information Systems (HIS) as it relates to health systems strengthening, the relevance of HIS for supporting decision making, approaches to HIS strengthening and monitoring, and available frameworks and tools for HIS strengthening (Global, Zambia).

Tuesday June 15, 2010 2:30pm - 5:00pm
Empire Ballroom

3:30pm

Spirit of Alma Ata 1978 Caucus Meeting
The Spirit of Alma Ata 1978 Caucus invites all conference participants to attend their annual meeting and share experiences, research, and resources for renewing primary health care.
http://www.globalhealth.org/view_top.php3?id=604#alma

Tuesday June 15, 2010 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Palladian Ballroom

4:00pm

Media Skills to Solve Health Ills: Deploying Modern Communications Against Ancient Health Problems
This event, specially designed for global health communicators, features three cutting edge campaigns to improve health in developing countries and advocate for it with the U.S. public - Living Proof of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Knowledge 4 Health of the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health and the African Broadcast Media Partnership against HIV/AIDS of the Kaiser Family Foundation. The goal of this event is that participants learn something from these campaigns that can be applied to their work, regardless of whether they have large or small budgets. It will be followed by a reception with drinks and snacks.

Tuesday June 15, 2010 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Embassy Room

4:30pm

2010 Poster Session #1 and Networking Reception
Mix and mingle with poster presenters at this year's poster sessions. With half of the presenters available during each session, you'll have an opportunity to interact with presenters to discuss their research and projects, as well as enjoy an informal and lively networking environment.
Each presenter is provided with a 44 in. x 46 in. (111 x 116 cm) bulletin board area to place charts, graphs, photos, text, and other artifacts that describe his/her project or study. Poster presenters will be available during their assigned session to speak with participants about their work. The poster gallery will remain up for viewing in the Blue Room Pre-Function area until 2 pm on Friday, June 18, 2010. Most presenters are selected from the competitive abstract process.This poster session will feature the presenters of the even numbers posters.

Tuesday June 15, 2010 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Blue Room Pre-Function

5:30pm

Sustainable Community Systems Strengthening for HIV and AIDS Care and Support for Vulnerable Populations
Sustainable Community Systems Strengthening for HIV and AIDS Care and Support for Vulnerable Populations World Vision is happy to share its experience responding to global impact of HIV and AIDS through its Hope Initiative: a child-focused, household and community-based initiative in partnership with government ministries, local and international agencies. The initiative empowers orphans and vulnerable populations through holistic, comprehensive and sustainable approaches to mitigate the impact of HIV and AIDS at individual, household and community levels, carried out through expansion of HIV prevention, strengthening household and community capacity to care for the infected and affected and promoting advocacy around issues of HIV. World Vision through government, bilateral grants, public-private partnerships, and private funds, implements HIV and AIDS projects in 60 countries, annually serving more than 1.5 million children, chronically ill persons, and faith leaders. Best practices and lessons learned providing sustainable community systems strengthening at household, community and national levels will be presented as essential steps in comprehensive response to OVC care and support.
http://www.worldvision.org/

Tuesday June 15, 2010 5:30pm - 7:30pm
Blue Room

6:30pm

6:30pm

Helping Babies Breathe - Reports from Bangladesh, India, Kenya, Pakistan, and Tanzania
This session will provide you with an introduction to Helping Babies Breathe, a neonatal resuscitation curriculum developed so all persons who care for babies at birth can learn to help babies who do not initially breathe well. Reports, stories, and data from the 5 countries where HBB was piloted will be shared by the principal investigators and master trainers. The objective of HBB is to train health care providers and birth attendants in developing countries. A unique methodology and a hands-on focus are used to teach The Golden Minute concept that identifies the steps that birth attendants must take in that first minute of life. HBB has the potential to make a significant contribution to MDG 4. Helping Babies Breathe is developed by the American Academy of Pediatrics in collaboration with USAID, Saving Newborn Lives, NICHD, and other stakeholders.

http://www.helpingbabiesbreathe.org/

Tuesday June 15, 2010 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Hampton Ballroom

6:30pm

Moving Integration in Global Health from Rhetoric to Reality
Integration in health can help achieve a more harmonious service delivery strategy that improves efficiency and cost effectiveness, and recognizes the holistic needs of the client. Integration in health has been defined in two principal ways. The first is between programming and/or funding of vertical interventions such as HIV/AIDS, TB, or family planning. The second is between these vertical interventions and a horizontal health systems strengthening agenda. The core question we strive to answer is: how can we move beyond rhetoric to real functional integration that improves population health outcomes? Our panel (speakers TBD) will explore this question by discussing how vertical HIV/AIDS programming has had a spillover effect on broader health systems strengthening efforts, what USAID and/or PEPFAR priorities are for integration, and where field projects have had success with integration, such as the Chemonics-implemented USAID project in Angola.
http://www.chemonics.com

Tuesday June 15, 2010 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Executive Room

6:30pm

Stronger Health Systems for Greater Health Impact
Health systems strengthening is the only path to sustainable health impact. But how do we know what works? And what kind of progress are we making? Join MSH for a wine and cheese reception with opening words by Afghan Ambassador Said Jawad (invited), Haitian Minister of Health Alex Larsen, and MSH Chief Executive Officer Dr. Jonathan D. Quick. In Afghanistan, Haiti, and around the world, MSH is building stronger health systems to reverse the spread of infectious disease and achieve universal access to basic health services. How is your organization contributing to this global effort and how can we work together?
http://www.msh.org/

Tuesday June 15, 2010 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Congressional Room

6:30pm

The Sound of Hope: Making Hearing Matter in the Developing World
Hearing loss is a widespread problem that lies at the core of health, education, and economic development. The WHO estimates that at least 4.5% of the world's population has disabling hearing loss that affects their ability to communicate and to participate in education or work. The numbers are even more striking in developing countries where up to 20% of children may fail basic hearing screening exams and there is often little or no access to services for their hearing loss. Fortunately, over half of the cases of hearing loss are preventable through programs that support vaccination, limit access to ototoxic drugs, curb exposures to harmful noise in the workplace, integrate ear and hearing health into primary healthcare, and providing the hearing impaired with adequate services and rehabilitation. This event will explore the critical need and challenges of incorporating these programs into our healthcare goals for developing countries.
http://www.entlink.net/

Tuesday June 15, 2010 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Governors Room

7:00pm

Bridging the Divide: HIV Catalyzing Transformation of Health Systems
The International AIDS Society (IAS), with the funding from the Rockefeller Foundation and in collaboration with the International Centre for AIDS Care and Treatment Programs (ICAP) at Columbia University, convened a pre-conference at the IAS 2009 Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention on 18 July, 2009 in Cape Town. The meeting gathered up to 100 experts, researchers, practitioners and implementers from the fields of HIV and health systems to review the results and progress from the work currently being carried out in the area of HIV and health systems strengthening by a range of international experts. The IAS-ICAP Satellite will build on the IAS 2009 Cape Town pre-conference discussions and provide an opportunity for GHC conference delegates to discuss the following critical questions. What is the evidence on the impact of HIV scale-up on broader health systems? Why - HIV can catalyze transformation of health systems? What strategies are required in leveraging the impact of HIV programming to improve non-targeted services? What examples of models of good practice? What are the options in moving forward the agenda - to accelerate research, rigorous evaluation and bridge the divide between HIV programming, other priority health conditions and health systems strengthening? Session Moderators: Dr. Wafaa El-Sadr, ICAP Director and Robin Gorna, IAS Executive Director.

Tuesday June 15, 2010 7:00pm - 9:00pm
Palladian Ballroom

7:00pm

Increase in Service Delivery Through Increased Awareness for Positive Maternal, Neonatal, and Child Health Behaviors
Increase in Service Delivery through Increased Awareness for Positive Maternal, Neonatal, and Child Health Behaviors The USAID-funded PAIMAN project has made a major contribution to improving MNCH in 24 districts of Pakistan through evidence-based communication, advocacy and mobilization strategies, through a package of community-based obstetrical and neonatal services, and by provision of 24/7 referral services. PAIMAN has established a network of religious scholars (Ulama) that disseminates MNCH messages through Friday sermons. In addition strong mass media component that includes a drama series: Paiman, two music videos, seven television commercials, a series of PAIMAN TV magazine shows, a radio magazine show and two documentaries on puppet shows and the Ulama intervention. At the same time a package of community-based obstetrical and neonatal services were offered through developing a new cadre of CMWs, orientation of TBAs on clean delivery practices, and arrangement of emergency transport system. Referral health facilities have been upgradated and and human resource issues were addressed through innovative solutions. As shown by the information generated through a renewed HMIS, PAIMAN's innovative strategies have tremendously improved the utilization of MNCH services by women and children across Pakistan.
http://www.paiman.org.pk/

Tuesday June 15, 2010 7:00pm - 9:00pm
Diplomat Ballroom

7:00pm

The Role of INGOs in a Changing Development Landscape
A candid dialogue on the role of INGOs in a changing development landscape. Challenging questions will be directed to leaders from INGOs, multilaterals, developing world government(s) and US government. The Global Health Initiative makes country ownership of the health agenda a clear priority. What does that mean for health and development assistance? Bringing our diverse perspectives into a single conversation will help us better understand the implementation challenges, what tools will be necessary to succeed in this new environment, and what steps we can take-separately and in partnership-to achieve sustainable results. Key questions will include: - What should the role of INGOs be going forward? - How can their collective wisdom be leveraged for maximum impact? - How should INGOs retool to more effectively deliver their technical and capacity building expertise in this new environment? We look forward to your participation in this important discussion.

Tuesday June 15, 2010 7:00pm - 9:00pm
Empire Ballroom

12:00am

 
Wednesday, June 16
 

8:00am

Plenary: New Frontiers in Global Health
The burden of disease is transitioning from infectious diseases to non-communicable diseases, from acute to chronic diseases. We are also seeing demographic changes including urbanization and an aging population. This session will explore the challenges and some innovative solutions in the areas of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, mental health, cancer and aging.

Wednesday June 16, 2010 8:00am - 9:30am
Regency Ballroom

8:00am

Exhibition Hall Open
Continental Breakfast: 8-9 am

Wednesday June 16, 2010 8:00am - 4:00pm
Exhibition Hall

8:00am

The Global Marketplace
The Global Marketplace will highlight the sustaining benefits of community-based Global Health and humanitarian affairs projects. Participants in the Global Marketplace will be able to highlight their products and services to conference attendees. Additionally, through the Global Marketplace, conference attendees can purchase handicrafts directly from developing country organizations or organizations working with developing country communities operating under the principles of fair trade.

Wednesday June 16, 2010 8:00am - 4:00pm
Exhibition Hall

8:00am

9:30am

Global Health Council Annual Membership Meeting
The Council invites all our members to come and hear more about the Council's plans for the second half of 2010 and beyond.

Wednesday June 16, 2010 9:30am - 10:30am
Ambassador Ballroom

9:45am

Who Defines Global Health?
A panel discussion will be presented on the difference between international health and global health, and how there has been a paradigm shift in the pattern of thought surrounding the provision of health care to underdeveloped countries. Despite the shift to a school of thought that more thoroughly brings in all people, the ones who define health are still the ones who possess the wealth and provide the aide. This undermines health care. The people and countries receiving aide need to be included at all levels of the process, from defining what global health is to deciding the aide that is provided to influencing the training and implementation of the global health workers and the programs they provide.

Wednesday June 16, 2010 9:45am - 10:15am
Exhibition Hall

9:45am

Roundtable Session: Diplomat Ballroom
This roundtable session will take place in the Diplomat Ballroom, organized by theme/topic and/or key health issue. Each presenter sits at a table with a small group of participants to discuss a program or research topic. During the 1 hour 45 min. session, each presenter will give his/her presentation twice so participants will have the opportunity to attend two roundtable presentations. The session will flow as follows: presenter has 20 minutes to present, followed by a 20-minute question-and-answer period; the participants have the opportunity to change tables and then the process starts over again for the second time. Most presenters are selected from the competitive abstract process.
Key Health Issues in the Diplomat Ballroom include:
1. Capacity Building
2. Infectious Disease
3. Sanitation
4. Service Delivery
5. Violence and Injury

Wednesday June 16, 2010 9:45am - 11:30am
Diplomat Ballroom

9:45am

Roundtable Session: Palladian Ballroom
This roundtable session will take place in the Palladian Ballroom, organized by theme/topic and/or key health issue. Each presenter sits at a table with a small group of participants to discuss a program or research topic. During the 1 hour 45 min. session, each presenter will give his/her presentation twice so participants will have the opportunity to attend two roundtable presentations. The session will flow as follows: presenter has 20 minutes to present, followed by a 20-minute question-and-answer period; the participants have the opportunity to change tables and then the process starts over again for the second time. Most presenters are selected from the competitive abstract process. Key Health Issues in the Palladian Ballroom include:
1.Child Health
2. Chronic/Degenerative Diseases
3. Health Systems
4. Sexual and Reproductive Health

Wednesday June 16, 2010 9:45am - 11:30am
Palladian Ballroom

9:45am

Research Track: Research Symposium: Taking Metrics Global - Measuring Results and Understanding Behavior

There has been much discussion in recent years about developing and harmonizing indicators. Many of these discussions have taken place in the context of US government efforts to restructure foreign assistance and reauthorize PEPFAR, calls for harmonization and standardization among donor-required assessment tools, and the introduction of large extra-governmental actors, such as the Global Fund for AIDS, TB & Malaria and the Gates Foundation into the complicated global health milieu. Yet, developing a common set of measurable indicators is only one step in the process of better understanding global health. We need to move from outputs to outcomes to impact. It is important to measure not only what is being/has been done and delivered but to also assess the changes that these induced and the factors that have influenced them (measuring outcomes and demonstrating impact).

Measuring Results.
On a population level, a better understanding of global health patterns and trends requires standard and common measures. The goal is to develop asset of measures that can be compared between countries, which may include both program outputs and health outcomes. These measures maybe fairly simple and can be translated from one program, language or culture to another. However, they also tend to focus on program outputs rather than on health outcomes - more work is needed to move toward measures of program results.

Measuring Behavior.
To make progress in addressing problems on the ground, a better understanding of the complex nature of health issues is needed. This requires establishing new or adapting existing tools that assess behavior-based constructs in a more comprehensive manner. In addition to measuring health outcomes, successful programs need to assess risk factors and social determinants. For example, determining the impact of depressive symptoms on maternal health or health-seeking behavior warrants more than a single question - a number of instruments used in the US and other industrialized countries (e.g., the CESD) could potentially be adapted for use in developing countries. Measurement of these more complex constructs could provide richer data and suggest ways to improve services.

Presentations:
Scaling-up Sustainably. With a variety of state and non-state actors involved in global health delivery, a challenge lies in the integration of a disease-specific program with the public health sector. With great unmet need, implementers and donors are assessing how best to scale and sustain their services. New measures are required to capture how best to integrate, manage and operate programs at scale. Dr. Rebecca Weintraub of GHD will review findings from the following studies: WHO Maximizing Positive Synergies Project, Critical interactions between Global Fund-supported programs and health systems and Sustaining Delivery at Scale supported by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Strategic Frameworks in Program Assessment. Frameworks to assess programs benefit from a consultative development process that involves stakeholders, creating room for collective ownership and collaboration with partners in evaluating common results. Jane Kengeya-Kayondo will present a framework for systematic assessment of TDR's performance, its strategic relevance and contribution to global health. The framework is a potential approach for measuring the results and changes that can be attributed to research and scientific capacity development providing the basis for continuous improvement. Discussion will include the key principles followed, lessons learned, and the challenges faced.

Breakout Sessions: Complex Measures in Women's Health

In this exercise, participants will work through how to measure constructs that are multifaceted and often not adequately assessed in program evaluation processes. This exercise will enable participants to step beyond the numbers and the disease-specific silos and to move toward understand the people and the life circumstances that influence health-seeking behaviors.


Wednesday June 16, 2010 9:45am - 12:30pm
Hampton Ballroom

10:30am

Aspects of Humanitarian Travel
Here one can learn how to prepare for a trip, cost considerations, what to expect at the airport and security tips for their arrival. Raptim's draws on the experiences of our clients and associates who have answered the call to serve others and will provide a dynamic perspective on this very important aspect of the NGO community.
www.raptim.com

Wednesday June 16, 2010 10:30am - 11:15am
Exhibition Hall

10:30am

Policy Track: Countdown to 2015
In 2005, a collaboration among individuals and institutions produced a report tracking coverage for maternal, newborn and child interventions needed to reach the Millennium Development Goals for maternal and child health (MDGs 4 and 5). This report is being updated this year, and this session will present the new data from this report.

Wednesday June 16, 2010 10:30am - 12:15pm
Blue Room

10:30am

C1: Beyond Sexual Violence: Next Steps in Helping Victims
Presenters Discuss:
violence against women as a serious health issue in Jordan and efforts to work with private providers and measures of success in programs for identification and referral of potential violence against women victims in private hospitals and clinics (Jordan); the framework used by the UNFPA/UNICEF Joint Program on FGM/C to accelerate the abandonment of female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) and its achievement (sub Saharan Africa); and innovative and replicable strategies for responding to the health and justice needs of sexual assault survivors (Sub Saharan Africa, Zambia).

Wednesday June 16, 2010 10:30am - 12:15pm
Congressional Room

10:30am

C2: Optimizing and Leveraging Private Sector Partnerships
Presenters Discuss:
the approaches USAID used to work with the private sector in health over the past 30 years, how the approaches contributed to the attainment of USAID's goals; advantages of using private sector providers to reach the poorest population; and reasons for the success of private sector initiatives (Global); successful methods and challenging issues in developing public private partnerships using several of Chevron's key partnerships to address health issues as examples, the drivers and interests in partnership from a company's perspective and some of the nuts and bolts in building them (Global); the goals and objectives of the partnerships, how progress towards these goals was measured, how achievements and lessons learned informed future directions, and how Botswana's experience (Sub Saharan Africa, Botswana); and AED's India strategy of leveraging NGO partnerships to take POU interventions to scale (India).

Wednesday June 16, 2010 10:30am - 12:15pm
Empire Ballroom

10:30am

C3: Reaching MDG 6: What Will it Take to Make TB History?
Presenters Discuss:
the prevalence and magnitude of pulmonary TB and drug resistant TB in the largest prison in Bangladesh and to assess risk factors associated with the development of TB among the prisoners (Bangladesh); actions taken to fully implement the new Stop TB Strategy and the outcomes of these actions in relation to progress being made towards the 2015 TB care and control targets (Kenya); and the concept of contact slips, how it is administered and how it increases number of screened TB contacts. (South Africa).

Wednesday June 16, 2010 10:30am - 12:15pm
Governors Room

10:30am

C4: Improving Existing Data to Sustain Gains in Global Health
Presenters Discuss:
how consistent use of data by frontline providers to track their performance can improve data quality and how leadership attention and data feedback to frontline providers make providers more conscious about data quality (Ghana); improvements in quality of data reported by primary health care facilities achieved due to the implementation of a performance improvement process (Pakistan); lessons learned about the potential for large scale deployment of phone based information systems for community health workers (Tanzania); and quality care for patients in terms of eliminating gaps, time series plots to graph the results, Gaps Analysis Framework to identify the quality gaps, causes of gaps and Plan-Do-Study-Act Cycles (PDSA's) to bridge the gaps (Global).

Wednesday June 16, 2010 10:30am - 12:15pm
Capitol Room

10:30am

Member Event/Book Chat: Nonprofit Finance for Hard Times: New Definitions, New Strategies, New Opportunities
Join Susan Raymond, Ph.D., executive director at Changing Our World, for this exclusive members-only event discussing her book, Nonprofit Finance for Hard Times: Leadership Strategies When Economies Falter. In times of economic crisis, how does your nonprofit navigate turbulent waters? Learn strategic steps to prepare for and respond to economic crises, including the relationship between economic cycles and nonprofit revenues, a systems approach to revenue strategy, and innovations in philanthropic financial support strategies. The first forty members to arrive will receive a complimentary copy of this great book, signed by the author.
A case study will be presented on diversification strategies for financing an organization's work. Learn more from Kurt Soderlund, the CEO of the Safe Water Network.

Wednesday June 16, 2010 10:30am - 12:15pm
Executive Room

11:15am

Kwikpoint Tuberculosis Smart Card and Sputum Collection Procedure Visual Guide
Kwikpoint Tuberculosis Smart Card and Sputum Collection Procedure Visual Guide
Two key contributing factors to the burden of tuberculosis in South Africa are the lack of patient knowledge about the disease, and the Sputum Smear Microscopy test. Kwikpoint has created a visually engaging pocket-sized educational card, printed on a durable synthetic, for use by TB patients in South Africa. The end users of the Sputum Collection Procedure Visual Guide are patients who visit clinics for the TB Sputum Smear Microscopy Test, based on WHO procedures.These guides are unique in that they incorporate colorful, attractive, well thought-out and culturally appropriate images specifically designed to help low-literacy audiences educate themselves on TB.
www.kwikpoint.com

Wednesday June 16, 2010 11:15am - 11:45am
Exhibition Hall

12:00pm

Behavior Change through Mass Media - A Media MIX Approach adopted by PAIMAN
Pakistan a country of 170 million has some of the worst MNCH health indicators in the region. PAIMAN (Pakistan Initiative for Mothers and Newborns) is a six-year USAID funded project implemented in 24 districts by a consortium led by JSI. PAIMAN is designed to reduce maternal, newborn and child mortality in Pakistan and address issues of FP. PAIMAN approaches the target audience through a media mix helped in creating desired results. The presentation will focus on the challenges that the project had in terms of BCC and the approach it adopted. This presentation will also share with the audience the impact evaluation of media products and the way forward.

Wednesday June 16, 2010 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Exhibition Hall

12:00pm

The Global Fund Deploys Social Media Against AIDS
Join the Geneva-based communications staff of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria in a special session of the Council's Global Health Communicators Working Group @ Conference. Sabine Niewiadomski and Jeremy Bogen will talk about the Global Fund's new focus on social media and how they are deploying it against AIDS, TB and malaria, focusing on their new campaign Born HIV Free that was launched May 19 and how you can use social media in your global health communications work.
http://www.theglobalfund.org/en/pressreleases/?pr=pr_100521

Wednesday June 16, 2010 12:00pm - 1:15pm
Diplomat Ballroom

12:00pm

Policy Track: Congressional Briefing: 'Helping Babies Get to One'
The American Academy of Pediatrics cordially invites you to a briefing on Helping Babies Breathe, a global public-private initiative to reduce infant mortality. Come and be a part of a launch of a new report examining different interventions/approaches for helping newborn babies live until they are the age of one. This event will feature in-country experts from various countries from around the world. Helping Babies Breath (HBB) is an evidence-based curriculum in neonatal resuscitation for use in resource limited areas. The scientific basis for this educational program is the neonatal evidence evaluation of ILCOR (International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation), the evidence base also shared by the Neonatal Resuscitation Program of the American Academy of Pediatrics/American Heart Association. The global curriculum is designed to be used by skilled birth attendants who are responsible for the care of both the woman and the newborn infant at delivery, who may not have assistance from a second trained helper. Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to jbaumberger@aap.org.

12:30pm

Luncheon Plenary/Book Chat: Globalization and Health: A Dialogue with the Author of Turning the World Upside Down: The Search for Global Health in the 21st Century
Lord Nigel Crisp explores a new vision for global health in his book. Instead of higher-income countries importing health workers from lower-income countries and exporting their ideas and ideologies about health, what if it was turned upside down. What can higher-income countries learn from lower-income countries regarding their ideas and experience about health? What about co-development, where countries learn from each other? Explore these questions and more.

Wednesday June 16, 2010 12:30pm - 1:45pm
Regency Ballroom

12:30pm

Luncheon: Extending Service Delivery (ESD) Project - End of Project Conference
The USAID-funded Extending Service Delivery (ESD) Project is managed and directed by Pathfinder International in partnership with IntraHealth International, Management Sciences for Health, and Meridian Group International, Inc. ESD addresses the need for quality, community-based reproductive health and family planning services and information for poor, hard-to-reach, and under-served populations and is USAID's flagship project in RH/FP. ESD's luncheon will showcase the project's accomplishments throughout its five-year lifetime, and portray how it helped to implement and scale-up best and promising practices to meet the needs of some of the most underserved. Some of the topical areas addressed will be: working with religious leaders to raise awareness about RH/FP; engaging the private sector to promote RH/FP through corporate social responsibility; integrating healthy timing and spacing messages into health programs around the world, and; scaling-up FP/MNCH best practices across the health care continuum.
http://www.esdproj.org/site/PageServer

Wednesday June 16, 2010 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Ambassador Ballroom

12:30pm

Film Series: Shuga
Shuga, part of MTV Staying Alive's regional HIV campaign Ignite is a hard-hitting three-part drama series set in Nairobi, Kenya that follows the lives and loves of a group of cool young students whose bright lives and fabulous futures are balanced on a knife-edge due to their love of risk and danger. It is a story of love, sex, Friday nights and the indelible marks we leave on one another. Shuga tells the story of Ayira, a modern girl who knows exactly what she wants and what she has to do in order to get it; but will her passion for an older man come at the expense of long term soul mate Ty? Running parallel is the Romeo and Juliet style love story of Virginia and Leo - while the two are destined to be together, will they be able to get past the obstacles that stand in their way?

Wednesday June 16, 2010 12:30pm - 2:15pm
Embassy Film Theatre

12:30pm

12:45pm

Amazon Malaria Initiative: A strategic approach to assist in malaria control and prevention in the Amazon Basin
This Speaker's Corner presentation will focus on malaria in the Amazon Basin region. Specifically, how the Amazon Malaria Initiative is supporting the prevention and treatment of malaria and fulfilling Millennium Development Goals #6: Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases, which aims to reverse the incidence of malaria and other major diseases.
www.linksmedia.net

Wednesday June 16, 2010 12:45pm - 1:45pm
Exhibition Hall

1:30pm

Resume Development for Emerging Global Health Professionals | Career Connections
Provide a forum for those interested in improving their resumes and creating a more effective career tool in their search for a position in global health
www.ghfp.net

Wednesday June 16, 2010 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Exhibition Hall

2:00pm

Policy Track: Innovative Financing Mechanisms for Health: What's on the Menu?
In September 2008, the Taskforce on Innovative International Financing for Health Systems was launched to help strengthen health systems in the 49 poorest countries in the world. In May 2009, this taskforce released its recommendations in which it identifies a menu of innovative financing mechanisms to complement traditional aid and bridge the financing gaps that compromise attainment of the health-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). This session will explain and debate myriad mechanisms on the table.

Wednesday June 16, 2010 2:00pm - 3:45pm
Hampton Ballroom

2:00pm

Policy Track: Introduction to Global Campaigns on Maternal and Child Health
Over the last few years, global attention to maternal and child health issues grew tenfold. This interest brought about a number of global campaigns focused exclusively on addressing maternal and child health issues. Learn about the unique roles of campaigns such as the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health, White Ribbon Alliance, UK's Maternal Mortality Campaign and more, and learn about how you can get involved.

Wednesday June 16, 2010 2:00pm - 3:45pm
Empire Ballroom

2:00pm

Research Track: Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH) Global Health Core Competency Development Project Town Hall

Global health is public health. Due to the lack of consensus, however, on the core global health competencies expected of masters"'level students in global health programs, universities are providing varying levels of instruction and practica for their students. Meanwhile, health concerns shared across the globe are increasing. Chronic diseases, once nearly exclusive to higher"'income countries, are now on the rise in low"' and middle"'income countries, while infectious diseases (HIV, H1N1, tuberculosis) have spread easily to countries at every income level. Global health"'related infrastructure changes are already underway at many flagship universities, spurring the Association of Schools of Public Health to launch a national process to create a global health competency model. The process will take place in two phases, for two different target audiences.

Phase 1: Competencies for master's level students in global health programs.
Phase 2: Competencies for all students in a globalized graduate public health curriculum.

This town hall session will discuss the aims of the project, the competency development process, and the current status of the project.

Wednesday June 16, 2010 2:00pm - 3:45pm
Capitol Room

2:00pm

D1: Nutritional Supplements and Complementary Feeding Practices
Presenters Discuss:
the process and outcome of implementing a rural community based behavior change project (Bangladesh.); the biological impact and operational feasibility of incorporating Ultra Rice into India's Midday Meal Scheme (India) how to design, implement, monitor and evaluate a community based nutrition education intervention, the effects of an educational intervention on caretakers' knowledge, attitudes and behaviors, as well as on child nutrition and health outcomes, and the key components of a successful community based intervention program.

Wednesday June 16, 2010 2:00pm - 3:45pm
Congressional Room

2:00pm

D2: Leveraging Capacity: Making Use of Existing Information Systems
Presenters Discuss:
how information has been used in Sierra Leone by health districts and civil society to address poor health indicators (Sierra Leone); new alternative approaches to measuring mortality and causes of death in the communities and how the information can complement and strengthen existing national health systems in developing countries (sub Saharan Africa); and how the establishment of health information systems improves monitoring and evaluation of health interventions, solidifies partnerships, and builds capacity (China/Myanmar border).Presenters Discuss: the strong impact healthy timing and spacing of pregnancies (HTSP) has on averting unnecessary childhood deaths (West Africa); two key HTSP messages, how HTSP promotes healthy fertility, how Lactational Amenorrhea Method (LAM) and Standard Days Method (SDM) serve as gateways to other family planning methods (India, Guatemala, Mali, Kenya); describe integrated PNC/FP package; 2) discuss attitudes toward family planning and healthy pregnancy spacing among postpartum women (Kenya); and key findings from six USAID sponsored studies on spacing and adverse outcomes, what's new about healthy timing and spacing of pregnancy (HTSP), key HTSP messages, and Extending Service Delivery's (ESD) successful knowledge to action approach using advocacy networks to mainstream HTSP from the global to local level (global).

Wednesday June 16, 2010 2:00pm - 3:45pm
Executive Room

2:00pm

D3: From Evidence to Action: Mainstreaming Healthy Timing and Spacing of Pregnancies
Presenters Discuss:
the strong impact healthy timing and spacing of pregnancies (HTSP) has on averting unnecessary childhood deaths (West Africa); two key HTSP messages, how HTSP promotes healthy fertility, how Lactational Amenorrhea Method (LAM) and Standard Days Method (SDM) serve as gateways to other family planning methods (India, Guatemala, Mali, Kenya); describe integrated PNC/FP package; 2) discuss attitudes toward family planning and healthy pregnancy spacing among postpartum women (Kenya); and key findings from six USAID sponsored studies on spacing and adverse outcomes, what's new about healthy timing and spacing of pregnancy (HTSP), key HTSP messages, and Extending Service Delivery's (ESD) successful knowledge to action approach using advocacy networks to mainstream HTSP from the global to local level (global).

Wednesday June 16, 2010 2:00pm - 3:45pm
Blue Room

2:00pm

D4: Policy Initiatives to Break the Cycle of Neglect for Chagas
Presenters Discuss:
the policy initiatives being implemented to address the urgent need increase R&D for better medical tools (Americas); an overview of the policy landscape for neglected diseases, access to and innovation of medicines used in these diseases in the Americas, and an understanding of the determinants, challenges and perspectives on the future in access and innovation of medicines for the treatment of Chagas (Americas); the cycle of neglect that prevents patients with Chagas disease from accessing diagnosis and treatment and how policy change, political will, funding and implementation are crucial elements to break this cycle (Americas, Europe)

Wednesday June 16, 2010 2:00pm - 3:45pm
Governors Room

2:00pm

D5: Global Leadership: Who is Fighting Drug Resistance and How?
Presenters Discuss:
the role and responsibility of donor organizations in the global battle against drug resistance, how donors have tackled resistance in the past and what changes are needed to ramp up current efforts by the larger donor community (Global); government sectors and policy issues that contribute to antimicrobial resistance (Global); the challenges of antimicrobial resistance as it relate to incentives of patients, physicians, hospitals, agricultural producers and other actors and current efforts to develop effective policies at a national and global scale to manage this life saving, limited, resource; and potential roles of private sector organization in the global battle against antimicrobial resistance (Global).

Wednesday June 16, 2010 2:00pm - 3:45pm
Diplomat Ballroom

2:00pm

D6: Building Global Health Careers: It's All About People
Presenters Discuss:
a successful and scalable partnership model to reduce financial barriers for aspiring health workers (Uganda, East Africa); the value of high quality health workforce information, emerging standards for human resources for health (HRH) information, and examples of countries using standards and systems to improve HRH policies and decisions (sub Saharan Africa); how capacity building for health professionals through a Fellowship Program can improve HIV/AIDS services in challenging environments (Nigeria); and how the Management Support to Provinces (MSP) initiative in Afghanistan improved the stewardship capacity of a Provincial Health Office (Herat Province, Afghanistan).

Wednesday June 16, 2010 2:00pm - 3:45pm
Palladian Ballroom

2:15pm

Advice & Budget Guidance for Humanitarian Travel
A briefing from a leading travel company serving the non-profit sector offering you the chance to hear how the adoption of best practice travel management policies could save the NGO and Medical Health community millions of dollars per year and enhance employee welfare whilst travelling. It also offers the chance to network with and meet individuals from similar organisations who may face common challenges. Key travel will provide advice on the protections of humanitarian workers while traveling along with practical guidance on how to reduce your travel budget by 20%
www.keytravel.com

Wednesday June 16, 2010 2:15pm - 2:45pm
Exhibition Hall

3:45pm

Plenary: After the Earthquake: Towards Building a New Haitian Health System
The massive earthquake which destroyed over 60% of Port-au-Prince and surrounding towns, while claiming over 200,000 lives, also took with it a good portion of Haiti's already fragile health infrastructure and placed extreme stresses on the remaining parts. Although no one could have predicted that such a catastrophe would occur, in many ways the human tragedy which ensued was entirely predictable given Haiti's long-term problems with weak governance, social inequality and environmental devastation. Far from a cause for despair, however, the crisis initiated by the earthquake carries with it the potential for a fundamental rethinking of Haiti's health system. The proximate issue of how best to make use of the flood of international humanitarian assistance and global attention to build a more resilient Haitian health infrastructure has put long-term reconstruction squarely on the agenda of all major parties to the relief effort. This panel convenes multiple stakeholders to the earthquake recovery effort to engage in a visionary conversation about the emerging shape of Haiti's future health system.

Wednesday June 16, 2010 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Regency Ballroom

5:00pm

2010 Poster Session #2 and Networking Reception
Mix and mingle with poster presenters at this year's poster sessions. With half of the presenters available during each session, you'll have an opportunity to interact with presenters to discuss their research and projects, as well as enjoy an informal and lively networking environment.
Each presenter is provided with a 44 in. x 46 in. (111 x 116 cm) bulletin board area to place charts, graphs, photos, text, and other artifacts that describe his/her project or study. Poster presenters will be available during their assigned session to speak with participants about their work. The poster gallery will remain up for viewing in the Blue Room Pre-Function area until 2 pm on Friday, June 18, 2010. Most presenters are selected from the competitive abstract process.This poster session will feature the presenters of the odd numbers posters.

Wednesday June 16, 2010 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Blue Room Pre-Function

6:00pm

Cervical Cancer Prevention: Recent Progress and Expanding Opportunities
Please join PATH and our partners for drinks, hors d'oeuvres and a lively exploration of the changing environment for cervical cancer prevention! Cervical cancer is a serious disease, with nearly 500,000 new cases each year and about 275,000 deaths, primarily in low-resource settings. New screening and treatment approaches, along with new vaccines, may be the keys to improving cervical cancer prevention in the developing world. An expert panel from UNFPA, PAHO, and PATH will share up-to-date information on the disproportionate burden of cervical cancer, highlight new policies aimed at increasing access to life-saving technologies, present the latest data from Africa, Asia and Latin America on operational research into strategies for reaching girls with HPV vaccine and describe demonstration studies of a new, lower-cost, easier-to-use and highly sensitive HPV DNA test. An innovative, online Action Planner also will be introduced.

http://www.path.org/

Wednesday June 16, 2010 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Congressional Room

6:00pm

Global Health Fellows Program/Public Health Institute Social Reception and Exemplar Awards
Join the Global Health Fellows Program/Public Health Institute for a fun social reception. Enjoy food, refreshments, music and socializing with your Global Health colleagues and don't miss the annual GHFP Outstanding Exemplar Awards. These awards are our way to raise awareness of the significance of developing a global health workforce for the future and to provide recognition for those who have taken a leadership role in this important effort.

http://www.ghfp.net/

Wednesday June 16, 2010 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Palladian Ballroom

6:00pm

Honoring Those Who Are Helping Rebuild Haiti
This event is an opportunity for the global health community to interact with the individuals and organizations who are involved in the task of helping rebuild Haiti's post-quake health systems and are working together with the government of Haiti to help provide access to health and human services.
http://www.abbottglobalcare.org/

Wednesday June 16, 2010 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Ambassador Ballroom

6:00pm

PRIDE in Saving Mothers and Children
PRIDE (Primary Healthcare Revitalization, Integration and Decentralization in Earthquake-affected areas) provides technical assistance to the Departments of Health in two districts in Pakistan devastated by the 2005 earthquake: Bagh District in AJ&K and Mansehra District in NWFP. The project is working in all 126 government primary health facilities in Bagh and Mansehra, which serve around 2 million people. PRIDE is committed to better health outcomes for the people of Bagh and Mansehra districts through improved health systems, health services and community participation. The project particularly seeks to address the ongoing tragedy of some of the worst maternal, newborn and child health indicators in South Asia. PRIDE is a $30 million project, funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). The project is implemented by a consortium of international partners including the International Rescue Committee, Jhpiego (a Johns Hopkins afflilate) and Management Sciences for Health.
RSVP to Deirdre Russo at drusso@jhpiego.net.

Wednesday June 16, 2010 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Diplomat Ballroom

6:30pm

Establishment of the Caribbean Public Health Agency
CARICOM heads of government formally approved the plans for the implementation of CARPHA. A cross section of partners are invited to join in a discussion of the CARPHA Implementation Plan which maps out the establishment of a fully functional agency by the latter half of 2014. This initiative among 12 member states of the Caribbean community and five associate members is a very significant undertaking to ensure that these relatively small states embark on an effective mechanism of functional cooperation that would strengthen their public health responses to outbreaks of diseases, emergencies and disasters and contribute to the health and development of the CARICOM region. It also offers prospects for closer collaboration in public health with the English, Dutch, and French overseas territories of the Caribbean as well as with the Spanish-speaking Caribbean and with partners in the hemisphere, Europe, and elsewhere.

Wednesday June 16, 2010 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Hampton Ballroom

6:30pm

Reducing Neonatal Deaths: Proven Solutions from Southeast Asia
This event will showcase the East Meets West Foundation's work in significantly reducing neonatal mortality and morbidity in Southeast Asia through customized, clinical solutions. The statistics are sobering: 99 percent of all newborn deaths occur in the developing world, almost two-thirds of infant deaths occur in the first month of life, and every year 4 million newborns die worldwide from easily treatable diseases. Yet newborn care is the branch of medicine with the least investment, research and innovation. Attempts to provide solutions often fail, because the interventions are not appropriate to the local conditions where they are implemented. The East Meets West Foundation has been tackling this issue in Vietnam for the past four years through its Breath of Life program, with outstanding results. Breath of Life provides key neonatal medical equipment to hospitals and integrates those technologies into the medical system by training medical personnel and working with the local health authorities to increase the capacity for newborn care. The equipment is locally engineered and manufactured in Vietnam, making it low cost. The program's flagship piece of technology, the Continuous Positive Air Pressure (CPAP) machine, treats respiratory distress, the most common ailment in newborns. A standard treatment in the developed world, CPAP was virtually nonexistent in Vietnam five years ago. When it was introduced in EMW's pilot program at the National Hospital of Pediatrics in Hanoi, 24-hour infant mortality rates dropped by 70 percent. The program is also providing a complementary array of neonatal equipment to tackle other causes of infant mortality and morbidity, including LED-equipped phototherapy machines to treat jaundice, infant warmers, and infection-control alcohol gel. Today, neonatal equipment provided by Breath of Life is operating in more than 140 hospitals in Vietnam, primarily at the national and provincial level. With simple, clinical interventions, Breath of Life has saved the lives of tens of thousands of babies, providing a replicable model of neonatal care that EMW is now implementing in Laos, Cambodia and East Timor. Come learn about this innovative program at our Global Health Council event. The event will include a short presentation on the program and a panel discussion with program staff who are directly working with the hospitals in Southeast Asia and our program advisors from Oakland Children's Research Hospital and Harvard Medical School who have overseen the program since inception in Vietnam, providing expertise and best practices to our partners in Southeast Asia.

www.eastmeetswest.org

Wednesday June 16, 2010 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Executive Room

6:30pm

Tackling HIV Related Stigma and Discrimination in South Asia: Lessons Learned
Although HIV prevalence in South Asia is low, marginalized groups such as sex workers, injecting drug users and men having sex with men are particularly vulnerable to HIV. Stigma and other barriers impede efforts to reach those most in need of prevention, care and treatment services. A competitive grants program: The South Asia Regional Development Marketplace: Tackling Stigma and Discrimination have supported innovative approaches for reducing S&D in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka, engaging a broad spectrum of groups, including transgender communities, MSM, IDU, sex workers, people living with HIV, the media and religious leaders. At this session we will present the lessons learnt from this initiative and showcase best practices in tackling stigma in South Asia. We will also discuss the monitoring and evaluation aspects of this regional effort to reduce stigma while building capacity among communities to monitor their programs. Stigma indicators that could be incorporated into national programs that scale up these innovations will also be discussed.

http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/COUNTRIES/SOUTHASIAEXT/0,,contentMDK:22078231~pagePK:146736~piPK:146830~theSitePK:223547,00.html

Wednesday June 16, 2010 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Governors Room

6:30pm

The Role of Human Resources in the Global Health Initiative: An Informal Dialogue
How can activities to strengthen health systems be most effectively integrated with service delivery? What are promising practices for rapid scale-up of health worker education and training? How can the problems of retention and low productivity best be addressed? What are the most effective advocacy strategies for human resources for health? What key indicators should the U.S. Government track? Join the global CapacityPlus Project for an informal, interactive conversation focusing on concrete, practical, and realistic suggestions for addressing the health worker crisis in the context of the Global Health Initiative.
http://www.capacityplus.org/

Wednesday June 16, 2010 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Empire Ballroom

7:00pm

Health SWAps in Sub-Saharan Africa: Delivering on the Promise?
Development assistance for health sector development increased from approximately $2 million in 1998 to $937 million in 2007. In 2006, funding for health sector support for the first time exceeded both TB- and malaria-specific funding (IHME 2009). During this time, the sector-wide approach (SWAp) has evolved as a way to coordinate financing for health, with improving health outcomes as its primary goal. But have SWAps delivered on their promise? ACTION (Advocacy to Control TB Internationally), with support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, will present new research on SWAps and the extent to which they appear to be linked to improvements in TB and other health outcomes, with a focus on projects supported by the World Bank and its development partners in sub-Saharan Africa. The session will include a discussion of the findings and recommendations for improving the implementation of SWAps. Reception to follow.
www.action.org

Wednesday June 16, 2010 7:00pm - 9:00pm
Capitol Room

12:00am

 
Thursday, June 17
 

8:00am

Exhibition Hall Open
Continental Breakfast: 7:30-8:30 am

Thursday June 17, 2010 8:00am - 4:00pm
Exhibition Hall

8:30am

8:45am

Plenary: Getting Further, Faster: Realizing Global Development Goals through Smart Health Investments in Sexual and Reproductive Health
This session brings together the major players - NGOs, governments, youth - in laying out the road maps created by the international community on sexual and reproductive health and rights. The session will explore how sexual and reproductive health and rights are essential to achieving a range of global goals, including ICPD + 15 and the MDGs, and the near-term steps that must be taken to accelerate progress in these areas. This is an important topic to address during a year in which we are seeing a new emphasis on a women-centered approach to health.

Thursday June 17, 2010 8:45am - 10:15am
Regency Ballroom

10:30am

CANCELLED: Sehat Sahulat Card Program, A Social Safety Net for Below Poverty Pregnant Females
This presentation will highlights the results of the pilot done in rural areas of a social safety net targeted to below poverty pregnant females in rural union councils of Pakistan. The pilot uses an innovative way to reduce Maternal and infant mortality by targeting poorest of the poor through poverty index.

Thursday June 17, 2010 10:30am - Wednesday June 16, 2010 11:00am
Exhibition Hall

10:30am

Book Chat: From the Ground Up: Building Comprehensive HIV/AIDS Care Programs in Resource-Limited Settings
From the Ground Up is a groundbreaking three-volume publication from the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, promoting a comprehensive approach to HIV/AIDS prevention, care, and treatment in resource-limited settings. More than 320 distinguished HIV/AIDS professionals from around the globe have contributed to this collection, which contains practical guidance on a wide variety of topics ranging from the science and treatment of HIV infection to human rights and workforce capacity.

Thursday June 17, 2010 10:30am - 11:30am
Embassy Room

10:30am

The First 30 Days: Emergency Health Response in the Aftermath of the Earthquake in Haiti
The devastating earthquake in Haiti triggered a massive international response with hundreds of organizations mobilizing to support the government and people of Haiti. Join in a discussion with representatives of the Haitian government, PAHO/WHO, the US military and NGOs who will share their perspectives as health responders in the earliest days of the emergency.

http://www.globalhealth.org/view_top.php3?id=604#humanitarian

Thursday June 17, 2010 10:30am - 12:15pm
Empire Ballroom

10:30am

Policy Track: Building Capacity for Achieving Health Goals
One of the biggest obstacles to achieving health goals is weak health systems and lack of capacity of organizations to effectively detect and respond to global health threats. This includes building the capacity of civil society, governments, both the public and private sector including but not limited to health professionals. This session will discuss various kinds of capacity building projects and how these projects have contributed to improving health in an area.

Thursday June 17, 2010 10:30am - 12:15pm
Capitol Room

10:30am

Policy Track: Finding Common Ground for Family Planning
This session will explore how one can make family planning acceptable and accessible in developing countries through a common ground approach. It will feature a recent survey of faith-based organizations and family planning and newer publications that have surfaced in the last year.

Thursday June 17, 2010 10:30am - 12:15pm
Hampton Ballroom

10:30am

E1: NIGH Panel: Focus on Prevention
Presenters Discuss:
the feasibility and effectiveness of an online video based intervention to motivate men who have sex with men in Peru to get tested for HIV (Peru); behavioral aspects involved in behavioral disinhibition following male circumcision and consider the results of urban Swazi men's perceptions of sexual risk following circumcision (Urban Swaziland); whether a return to traditional eating patterns from their home country would be a successful intervention strategy for Mexican immigrants in the US who have unhealthy dietary habits (North Carolina, USA); and implementing a participatory and community invested approach to hygiene education and behavior change communication (Western Region, Ghana).

Thursday June 17, 2010 10:30am - 12:15pm
Congressional Room

10:30am

E2: Removing Roadblocks: Effective Approaches in Improving Pharmaceutical Management
Presenters Discuss:
the importance of evidence based approaches for generating a policy change (Pakistan); surveillance for adverse drug reactions and treatment costs resulting from switch to new antimalarial drugs (Tanzania, Sub Sahara Africa); the supervision systems needed to assure malaria medicines availability and rational use in Latin America, national scale up of supervisory tools, and the role of the information generated by the supervisory tool in strengthening national malaria programs (Latin America); and the benefits of long term commodity forecasting as part of a broader HIV/AIDS commodity security strategy that supports resource mobilization to ensure financial sustainability of national HIV/AIDS programs (Nigeria).

Thursday June 17, 2010 10:30am - 12:15pm
Executive Room

10:30am

E3: Expanding Access through Mobile Health Services
Presenters Discuss:
a successful partnership to improve access to care and treatment for people living with HIV in rural areas (Tanzania); how evidence informed reproductive health program design can contribute to health outcomes of national significance (Sierra Leone); and how clinical officers can safely perform male circumcision (MC) through mobile outreach to designated public health care facilities in the community and how this approach is an effective strategy for addressing human resource shortages in male circumcision roll out (Kenya).

Thursday June 17, 2010 10:30am - 12:15pm
Blue Room

10:30am

E4: Health Vouchers: Successes and Obstacles to Effective Utilization
Presenters Discuss:
indicators commonly used in voucher program management, how program managers use measures of facility performance for decision making, and how spatial data on distance to facility and patient poverty assessments are incorporated with service data to map functional local healthcare markets (Kenya); how the public and private sectors worked together to increase access to insecticide treated nets (ITNs) for vulnerable groups in six countries in Africa, the potential of the commercial sector to help countries achieve catch up and sustain keep up, and the value of a targeted subsidy voucher program for achieving high rates of ITN ownership and use (Africa); the major components of the output based reproductive health voucher program in Uganda, the types of data generated by the program and strengths and weaknesses to the current program (Uganda); the role of transportation vouchers to improve maternal health care services by the trained providers (Bangladesh); and the impact of introducing vouchers for free IUD insertion through a social franchising approach in underserved areas in Pakistan and the key drivers for high voucher redemption rates (Pakistan).

Thursday June 17, 2010 10:30am - 12:15pm
Governors Room

10:30am

E5: MDG 4 and 5: Reaching Global Impact through Work at the Local Level
Presenters Discuss:
how conceptualizing health systems as complex adaptive systems changes evaluation strategies; how components of health systems at various levels interact to produce population health outcomes (Ghana); innovative approaches for accelerating and measuring progress toward MDGs 4 & 5 and an understanding of the Improvement Collaborative model for strengthening maternal newborn health services at scale in a West African setting (Niger, West Africa); and the potential for Improvement Collaborative Networks to accelerate peer to peer learning and large scale improvement, how process improvements can be simplified, ranked and packaged for scale up to achieve higher coverage, quality and reliability of implementation of health interventions and how time series analysis can be applied to diverse change ideas tested across multiple health facilities and communities to yield a robust context specific change package (Ghana).

Thursday June 17, 2010 10:30am - 12:15pm
Ambassador Ballroom

10:30am

E6: Next Steps in Health Information Systems Applications
Presenters Discuss:
the effectiveness of the Performance of Routine Information System Management (PRISM) framework and tools for strengthening routine health information systems (RHIS), the process of developing interventions for improving RHIS and factors that facilitate PRISM resulting in improved health system outputs (China, Pakistan) findings from a global dataset revealing country strengths and weaknesses on Health Information Systems (Global); how investment in an automated reporting system that provides quick access to quality data can provide a reliable supply of commodities, supporting universal access (Ethiopia); and how health information systems can contribute to decision making, improved health program performance, and better health outcomes (Global, Cote d'Ivoire, Ethiopia, Haiti, Pakistan)

Thursday June 17, 2010 10:30am - 12:15pm
Palladian Ballroom

11:15am

34 Million Friends: A Worldwide Grassroots Movement for the Women and Girls of the World
Women's health is key to any hope for the future, for people, the planet, and peace. The idea that, everyone must take a stand is the mission of 34 Million Friends of UNFPA, a worldwide grassroots movement for the women of the world. This presentation will discuss the idea of 34 Million Friends going worldwide as an education tool to involve millions of ordinary people in the fight for gender equality and women's rights to education, health, and choices.
http://www.34millionfriends.org/

Thursday June 17, 2010 11:15am - Wednesday June 16, 2010 11:45am
Exhibition Hall

12:00pm

Breeding Crops for Better Nutrition
The presentation will give an overview of the HarvestPlus project, which is a Challenge Program of the Consultative Group for International Agricultural Research (CGIAR). It will look at how HarvestPlus is working to biofortify staple crops in Africa and Asia with more micronutrients in order to address hidden hunger.
www.harvestplus.com

Thursday June 17, 2010 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Exhibition Hall

12:30pm

Film Series: Once in Afghanistan
In 1969, in response to the World Health Organization's challenge to eradicate smallpox worldwide, the U.S. Peace Corps sent a small group of women to Afghanistan to vaccinate. The group's task was to reach women and children in remote areas who might be missed by Afghan male vaccinating teams because of cultural taboos against such contact. The harsh climate, difficult terrain, organizational obstacles, and frequent resistance to vaccination provided constant challenges to the volunteers -- what was unchanging, however, was the generous hospitality of the Afghan people toward complete strangers -- a gift well remembered even 40 years later. The film ONCE IN AFGHANISTAN explores the women's often humorous recollections of adjusting to life in Afghanistan and the immense impact being there had on their lives. Filmmakers are Jill Vickers, a Peace Corps vaccinator, and Jody Bergedick, formerly with Middlebury (VT) Community Television, Children's Television Workshop, and Broad Street Productions (NY).

Thursday June 17, 2010 12:30pm - 2:15pm
Embassy Film Theatre

12:30pm

Media Awards Luncheon Session: Twitter Me This: Integrating Social Media into Your Communications Strategy
Following the program honoring this year's Excellence in Media Award winners, this year's informative and illuminative Media Discussion Panel will tackle the nuts and bolts of incorporating social media into your marketing, promotion and collaboration plan. Join us as the panel investigates the successes and challenges of digital communications. The talk concludes with a question and answer period.

Thursday June 17, 2010 12:30pm - 2:15pm
Regency Ballroom

12:45pm

Mid-Year Meeting of the International Health Section of the American Public Health Association
The mid-year meeting is an opportunity to revisit the annual goals and projects of the International Health Section of APHA, and to become involved. If you are a member, or are considering joining, please attend and participate. The session will include updates on committee activities and discussion of possible next steps. In addition, current elected leadership and invited others will be invited to remain after the session to review our strategic planning progress. Plans for the Annual meeting will be reviewed and discussed. The IH Section is a large section, and due to travel, there is a need for more active involvement. We are seeking individuals with interest to become involved with a good possibility of trying out your leadership and technical skills. Please attend ready to be involved.
A light lunch will be served.
http://www.apha.org/membergroups/sections/aphasections/intlhealth/

Thursday June 17, 2010 12:45pm - 2:30pm
Empire Ballroom

12:45pm

Breaking Through the Clutter: Crafting a User-friendly Resume
This interactive session will help you evaluate your resume from an employer's point of view and provide you with concrete strategies to make your resume stand out for GH recruiters.

Thursday June 17, 2010 12:45pm - 2:30pm
Blue Room

1:00pm

Research Track Workshop: Conducting High Impact Research
Limited Capacity seats available

Workshop participants will practice specific approaches and techniques that can be applied at each phase of the research process to improve the applicability and use of their research results. Participants will get hands-on experience using tools designed to facilitate this process. Staff from the MEASURE Evaluation Project will share specific examples of improving research impact. The MEASURE Evaluation Project works to strengthen the capacity of host country health programs to collect and use population and health data. Through a Data Demand and Use approach, the MEASURE Evaluation Project promotes a continuous cycle of data demand, collection, analysis and utilization to improve evidence based decision-making in health programs and policy development.

Thursday June 17, 2010 1:00pm - 5:30pm
Capitol Room

1:45pm

Interactive Data-Rich Maps
This presentation will demonstrate an innovate way of sharing country data to promote informed advocacy and decision making. Interactive maps that display country data on family planning will be available through the USAID | DELIVER PROJECT website. These maps answer questions such as: "Which contraceptives are offered in public sector health facilities?" "Were government funds spent on contraceptive procurement?"" and "What have contraceptive stockout rates at health facilities been in the last few years?"

Thursday June 17, 2010 1:45pm - 2:15pm
Exhibition Hall

2:00pm

Special Session: From Innovation to Access: Making the Connection Between Developing and Delivering Global Health Technologies and Development
Evidence from the field demonstrates that a comprehensive approach to global health can save lives, reduce costs and increase impact. Strengthening health systems requires a holistic approach to health: from developing new tools that are designed to reach the underserved even in remote areas, to increasing access to proven tools and interventions with an emphasis on strengthening health systems, to promoting an integrated approach for healthcare interventions. Panelists will present a more comprehensive approach to global health through cases examples from their work that link the entire value chain for health from early stage product research and development, through health systems strengthening, to healthcare delivery, and ultimately to economic and human development.

Thursday June 17, 2010 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Palladian Ballroom

2:30pm

Helping Reshape the Iraqi Health System
This workshop will provide an overview of long range, mid-term and short-term goals for the US Government in order to assist the Government of Iraq in rebuilding its health system capacity. The Strategic Framework Agreement (SFA), signed in December 2008, serves as the foundation for a long-term bilateral relationship based on mutual goals agreed upon by the United States and Iraq. The presenter will review the SFA as it relates to health cooperation and commitment, and implications for US Government agencies will be discussed. Host nation considerations and lessons learned will be emphasized.

Thursday June 17, 2010 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Exhibition Hall

3:15pm

Impact of Schistosomiasis and Polyparasitic Infections on Anemia, Growth and Physical Fitness in Children in Coastal Kenya
Schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease, remains one of the most serious and prevalent diseases worldwide. In 2005, there were an estimated 207 million people infected, with 89% of these living in the less-developed areas of rural sub-Saharan Africa and South America .Recently the term silent pandemic has been given to Schistosomiasis in relation to the historical underestimation of non-life threatening morbidities associated with the disease such as anemia, growth impairment in children and exercise intolerance. The focus of our ongoing study in Kenya is to address those morbidities as part of a larger study examining the ecology of transmission of Schistosomiasis.

Thursday June 17, 2010 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Exhibition Hall

3:30pm

Film Series: Pushing the Elephant
Pushing the Elephant chronicles the story of Rose Mapendo and how she escaped from the violence of the Democratic Republic of Congo to become a vital voice to help mend her divided country. She has assisted dozens of survivors to recover and rebuild their lives. But there is still one person Rose must teach to forgive - her daughter Nangabire. When war came to Rose's village, she was separated from her five-year-old daughter, Nangabire. She escaped with nine of her ten children and was resettled in Phoenix, Arizona. Over a decade later, mother and daughter are reunited in the US where they face the past and build a new future. We follow Rose and Nangabire over the course of two years as they make up for lost time. Rose struggles to find balance in her life as a mother of ten and a full-time advocate for refugees. Meanwhile, Nangabire, now 17, attempts to adapt to teenage life in Phoenix. She tries to accept Rose's message of reconciliation, but feels she has traded in one complicated life for another. This intimate family story brings to life the horrors that continue to be endured in Congo, the importance of international involvement, and the ways in which individual acts can make enormous contributions. The film will capture one of the most important stories of our age, in which genocidal violence is challenged by the moral fortitude and grace of one woman's mission for peace.

Thursday June 17, 2010 3:30pm - 5:30pm
Embassy Film Theatre

3:45pm

Policy Track: Ramping Up Health Worker Production in Resource-Limited Settings
In 2006, the World Health Organization noted that the world needs 4.5 million more workers to meet global health needs. In 2007, a Global Health Workforce Plan was released at the Global Health Workforce forum in Kampala, Uganda. This year marks the half-way mark for the Millennium Development Goals, including health goals. Health goals will not be met by 2015 without an increased health workforce. This session will examine the status of the Global Health Workforce Plan adopted in Kampala Uganda in 2007 and other plans.

Thursday June 17, 2010 3:45pm - 5:30pm
Palladian Ballroom

3:45pm

Policy Track: The U.S. and Multilateral Organizations
Innovation is essential for the improvement of global public health and multilateral institutions are increasingly influential drivers of innovation policy. This panel is composed of a series of presentations that examine how the U.S. Government engages multilateral institutions and encourages innovative public health interventions, programs and research. The presentations will discuss the different structures of multilateral institutions, including the World Health Organization, the G-8, the African Union, Global Fund and UNAIDS, their ability to pass and implement innovation resolutions, and the United States Government's role in the implementation and shaping of policy in the multilateral arena.

Thursday June 17, 2010 3:45pm - 5:30pm
Hampton Ballroom

3:45pm

F1: Standards, Partnerships and Other Tools for Quality Improvement
Presenters Discuss:
methods for composing an index for presenting comparable information on health facility service conditions across countries and how comparable and periodically updated indices of facility service conditions can contribute to health system strengthening (Africa and Eastern Caribbean States); the Maya Salud project, and the Partnership Defined Quality (PDQ) method utilized to improve access and quality of family planning in Guatemalan communities (Guatemala); an HIV/AIDS calculator to establish clinical targets at every facility (South Africa); and a model for estimating ART need at district/facility levels that can, combined with patient data on wellness and retention in care, guide actions to bridge gaps in ART care quality (Tanzania).

Thursday June 17, 2010 3:45pm - 5:30pm
Congressional Room

3:45pm

F2: Health Reform Approaches: Using Performance-based Financing to Reach Global Health Goals
Presenters Discuss:
recent interest in Results Based Financing, what the Health Results Innovation Trust Fund aims to achieve, and the importance of getting evidence based results from the impact evaluations of Results Based Financing (Sub Saharan Africa; Central Asia); the appropriateness, prerequisites, strengths and shortcomings of Performance Based Financing (PBF) interventions as strategies to support public health systems and the body of evidence accumulated through a chain of three country experiences (South east Asia; Sub Saharan Africa); the performance/results based financing (PBF/RBF ) concept its importance for improving access to quality health services and to reducing financial barriers to access, how PBF/RBF mechanisms link to improved health outcomes, the key factors of success in PBF/RBF and necessary elements for scaling up PBF to work through governmental systems 'management contract' arrangements, and internal contracting (Rwanda); and the three main principles of the Performance Based Financing (PBF) intervention of the NGO Cordaid, the mission or development goal of the NGO Cordaid in health system strengthening and the challenges that the NGO Cordaid faces related to sustainability and scaling up of PBF schemes (African Great Lakes Region).

Thursday June 17, 2010 3:45pm - 5:30pm
Executive Room

3:45pm

F3: Efforts and Achievements in Obstetrical and Postpartum Care in Asia
Presenters Discuss:
key elements of an initiative to increase institutional deliveries (northern Pakistan); a postpartum care model to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality for poor rural communities (India); a successful pilot intervention for the prevention of post partum hemorrhage at home deliveries through community based distribution of Misoprostol (Bangladesh); and the impact of the Mobile Obstetric Medics Project, a community based program to improve maternal health among vulnerable populations (Eastern Burma).

Thursday June 17, 2010 3:45pm - 5:30pm
Blue Room

3:45pm

F4: Accountability, Effectiveness and Transparency in Global Health
Presenters Discuss:
the process behind an inclusive international initiative that has the potential to change the way data on health projects are accessed and used (global); the challenges in making aid information transparent from the perspective of a partner country and the value to global health of an international standard for development data (Africa); whether, in the last decade, aid targeted towards infectious disease been has been going to the countries with the greatest need and has this aid been effective in lowering disease prevalence and mortality across the globe (Global).

Thursday June 17, 2010 3:45pm - 5:30pm
Governors Room

3:45pm

F5: Men, Violence and Gender Inequality: Cases from Brazil, India and South Africa
Presenters Discuss:
the gender related risk factors associated with rape, that rape prevention must be an essential part of the national development agenda, requiring a comprehensive national strategy to address the gendered nature of rape and South African masculinities (South Africa); men's use of and attitudes toward violence against women, and the economic, social, and gender factors that are associated with violence and that violence prevention requires a comprehensive strategy that takes into these factors and how they shape Brazilian masculinities (Brazil); and the role that childhood violence plays in men's perpetration of partner violence, risk behaviors and support for gender equality during adulthood and the program and policy implications of the findings (India).

Thursday June 17, 2010 3:45pm - 5:30pm
Diplomat Ballroom

3:45pm

F6: From Drug Users to Mother Support Groups: What's Working in HIV/AIDS Prevention
Presenters Discuss:
the mother support group (MSG) initiative and the documented contributions of MSGs to preventing perinatal HIV infection (Ethiopia); the importance of promoting HIV prevention at the workplace (Kenya); key characteristics of a successful HIV prevention intervention targeting women in a rural setting (rural southern United States.); and the dynamics of the HIV epidemic among injecting drug users in Pakistan and essentials of comprehensive preventive strategies adopted through public private partnership to halt HIV transmission among this most at risk group (Pakistan).

Thursday June 17, 2010 3:45pm - 5:30pm
Empire Ballroom

5:30pm

Exhibition Hall Open
Pre-Awards Banquet Reception
The gala evening festivities will begin in the International Exhibition hall as a prelude to the Awards Banquet.

Thursday June 17, 2010 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Exhibition Hall

5:30pm

Pre-Awards Banquet Reception
The gala evening festivities will begin in the International Exhibition hall as a prelude to the Awards Banquet.

Thursday June 17, 2010 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Exhibition Hall

6:30pm

Awards Banquet
Join us for this exciting annual event where we commemorate the accomplishments of the global health community!
The evening centers around four awards that honor extraordinary individuals and organizations that have made remarkable contributions to improve the health and well-being of the world's poor.
The Best Practices in Global Health Award
Excellence in Media Award
Jonathan Mann Award for Health and Human Rights
Gates Award for Global Health

Thursday June 17, 2010 6:30pm - 9:30pm
Regency Ballroom
  • Info This is a ticketed event. For information on available tickets, please see the Onsite Registration desk.
  • Tags #GHC37

12:00am

 
Friday, June 18
 

8:00am

Special Session/Book Chat: Breakfast with a Legend: D.A. Henderson
2010 marks the 30th anniversary of the certification of the eradication of smallpox. Join Dr. D.A. Henderson as he discusses his role in the global smallpox vaccination program for the world's children, resulting in the smallpox eradication, and his work to decrease the risk of biological terrorism threats. He will discuss his recently published book, Smallpox - The Death of a Disease: The Inside Story of Eradicating a Worldwide Killer.

Friday June 18, 2010 8:00am - 9:00am
Regency Ballroom

8:00am

Exhibition Hall Open
Continental Breakfast: 7:30-8:30 am

Friday June 18, 2010 8:00am - 11:00am
Exhibition Hall

8:30am

9:00am

Special Session: Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases and the Health Workforce
In June 2009, the Global Alliance for Chronic Disease was formed in response to the growing incidence of chronic non-communicable diseases throughout the world and particularly in the developing world, and the need for coordinated research programming. The institutions comprising the alliance collectively manage approximately 80 percent of all public health research funding worldwide and are targeting their activities toward the fight against chronic non-communicable diseases: cardiovascular diseases, several cancers, chronic respiratory conditions, and type 2 diabetes. Dr. Abdallah Daar, a member of the GACD, will discuss the goals of the Alliance, and the implications on the health workforce of this increase in chronic non-communicable diseases.

Friday June 18, 2010 9:00am - 10:30am
Executive Room

9:00am

Special Session: Sports and Health
General health and well-being is something that many people in developed countries take for granted but in the developing world, it is a serious issue. Sports have the potential to reach a multitude of people and influence their behaviors in a positive manner and empower traditionally un-empowered populations. This plenary will work to make global communities more aware of the value of sport and its overwhelmingly positive effects on health and wellbeing, and explore how sports can be an essential element to help us achieve the MDGs.

Friday June 18, 2010 9:00am - 10:30am
Regency Ballroom

9:00am

G1: Adding Metrics to the Reproductive Health Response in Humanitarian Relief Settings
Presenters Discuss:
components of a toolkit that assesses reproductive health needs, practical applications of the toolkit in two countries, selected findings, and how they inform program planning (Global, Thailand, Rwanda); how research can inform evidence based family planning services in refugee camps (Congolese Refugee Camps in Rwanda); utilization of and barriers to family planning among IDPs in North Darfur (North Darfur, Sudan); and planning for effective implementation of maternal and newborn mortality reduction strategies in a post conflict country using experiences from the 2008 Sierra Leone EmONC needs assessment survey (Sierra Leone, West Africa).

Friday June 18, 2010 9:00am - 10:45am
Diplomat Ballroom

9:00am

G2: Key Approaches to Address Urgent Health Needs of Adolescent Girls
Presenters Discuss:
the range of obstacles unmarried young women face in obtaining abortions (India); the program components that help girls manage menstruation and stay in school and discuss lessons learned from coordinating the delivery of menstrual management programming in schools (Ethiopia, South Africa); successful approaches to reduce unwanted pregnancies among adolescent girls enrolled in schools in West African countries (Forest Region, Guinea, West Africa); and the role played by education system and communities in the delivery of the human papillomavirus vaccinations (Uganda).

Friday June 18, 2010 9:00am - 10:45am
Palladian Ballroom

9:00am

G3: Research Track: NIGH Panel: Improved Methodologies in MCH Research
Presenters Discuss:
the relative cost effective benefits of different methods of sterilization in the developing world context (Sub Saharan Africa); the dynamics of child stunting in rural Guatemala and the importance of integrating quantitative data and ethnographic insights in program evaluation (Guatemala); the free, government run maternal healthcare system in Sri Lanka, utilization of care by mothers and pregnant women, and barriers to access in rural areas of the Kandy District such as language, geography, and working in the tea estate sector (Sri Lanka); a model for developing locally appropriate mental health screening tools (Rwanda); and institutionalized delivery versus quality care, quality improvement methodology's advantages in hospital based interventions, and how partograph use can facilitate quality improvement (Dominican Republic).

Friday June 18, 2010 9:00am - 10:45am
Congressional Room

9:00am

G4: Better Communication for Better Health
Presenters Discuss:
how community media can be utilized to increase community participation and amplify voices to stimulate positive change in five conflict affected countries to support MDGs 3, 5 and 6 (Liberia, Southern Sudan, Rwanda, Uganda, Thailand); the founding process of the first media training program on HIV/AIDS in China, the program's mission, target audience and workshop design methods and the particular challenges associated with media coverage in China and a plan to overcome them (China); the significant role that the Ethiopian Orthodox Church is playing in the fight against HIV and other harmful traditional practices by using an innovative approach, the potential role of the Church in passing key developmental messages to reach millions of people in a cost effective manner and the Church's approach to integrate the developmental issues in the training institutions of the Church and thereby ensuring their sustainability (Sub Saharan Africa); and intervention package consisting of an educational film followed by a structured discussion to improve knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors for prevention and care of human monkey pox infection (Republic of Congo).

Friday June 18, 2010 9:00am - 10:45am
Empire Ballroom

9:00am

G5: Measuring the Success of Open Source Health Information Systems
Presenters Discuss:
key design features of a medical records system adaptable to resource constrained environments and the need for patient medical records to provide quality care (South Africa, Kenya, Rwanda, Lesotho, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, Uganda, Tanzania, Haiti, India, China, United States, Pakistan, and the Philippines); collaborative efforts to unify disparate open source tools into a low cost toolkit and the value of open source technologies to collaborative development (India, Vietnam, Tajikistan, South Africa, Tanzania, Malawi, Zambia, the Gambia and Sierra Leone); results from a study of CommCare and lessons learned about open source development (Tanzania); and the challenges faced in healthcare delivery and management in rural areas in the developing world and the need for a broader health delivery infrastructure (Kenya).

Friday June 18, 2010 9:00am - 10:45am
Governors Room

9:00am

G6: Reaching the Goal of Making Surgery an Integral Part of Primary Health Care
Presenters Discuss:
the role of surgical care in WHO's new primary health care initiative; recent efforts by WHO to develop surgical care in low and middle income countries; ongoing efforts to prioritize surgical care in low and middle income countries; and barriers to the delivery of district level surgical and anesthetic services in low and middle income countries, including capacity (infrastructure, physical resources, and human resources for health), and quality, mapping of the capacity for services at the facilities level as a means to strengthen a countries health information system and how surgery and anesthesia may be integrated into primary health care reforms (Low and middle income countries).

Friday June 18, 2010 9:00am - 10:45am
Capitol Room

10:00am

W8: A Demonstration of the STEPS (Steps to Transforming Evaluation Practice for Social Change)
Limited Capacity seats available

Participants will understand how the STEPS resource can facilitate their work. Participants will understand how STEPS can support a participatory rights-based social justice approach to program planning, and monitoring and evaluation. Participants will understand what is unique to the STEPS resource. Participants will understand how STEPS can help them create locally meaningful and measurable objectives and indicators.Description: Demonstration of the STEPS (Steps to Transforming Evaluation Practice for Social Change) program planning, monitoring and evaluation resource. Participants will (ideally) be accessing the STEPS resource on computers for much of the workshop. (STEPS is a free program planning, monitoring and evaluation resource, funded by the Ford Foundation, on the web and CD, in English and Spanish.) STEPS is intended for organizations working towards the goals of women's empowerment and gender equality, especially those in the field of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR). The workshop will demonstrate how STEPS can help organizations apply a rights-based social justice perspective to their program planning, monitoring and evaluation process. It will include showing participants how STEPS teaches and supports the program development process- for example arguing for and teaching how to develop a Theory of Change, and helping users break down complex social and health concepts, such as women's empowerment, into measurable and locally relevant components that can be the basis for programming and evaluation. STEPS emphasizes self-learning in order to make M&E a meaningful and continuous aspect of the program process. It supports those who are most familiar with the program -those who directly provide services and the recipients of those services - to actively participate in M&E. This workshop will demonstrate how STEPS can assist organizations in making the program process a continual cycle of learning, improvement, and accountability.

Friday June 18, 2010 10:00am - 12:00pm
Embassy Room

10:00am

W8: A Demonstration of the STEPS (Steps to Transforming Evaluation Practice for Social Change)
Limited Capacity seats available

Participants will understand how the STEPS resource can facilitate their work. Participants will understand how STEPS can support a participatory rights-based social justice approach to program planning, and monitoring and evaluation. Participants will understand what is unique to the STEPS resource. Participants will understand how STEPS can help them create locally meaningful and measurable objectives and indicators.Description: Demonstration of the STEPS (Steps to Transforming Evaluation Practice for Social Change) program planning, monitoring and evaluation resource. Participants will (ideally) be accessing the STEPS resource on computers for much of the workshop. (STEPS is a free program planning, monitoring and evaluation resource, funded by the Ford Foundation, on the web and CD, in English and Spanish.) STEPS is intended for organizations working towards the goals of women's empowerment and gender equality, especially those in the field of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR). The workshop will demonstrate how STEPS can help organizations apply a rights-based social justice perspective to their program planning, monitoring and evaluation process. It will include showing participants how STEPS teaches and supports the program development process- for example arguing for and teaching how to develop a Theory of Change, and helping users break down complex social and health concepts, such as women's empowerment, into measurable and locally relevant components that can be the basis for programming and evaluation. STEPS emphasizes self-learning in order to make M&E a meaningful and continuous aspect of the program process. It supports those who are most familiar with the program -those who directly provide services and the recipients of those services - to actively participate in M&E. This workshop will demonstrate how STEPS can assist organizations in making the program process a continual cycle of learning, improvement, and accountability.

Friday June 18, 2010 10:00am - 12:00pm
Embassy Room

10:30am

Policy Track: The 2010 G8 Agenda: How Does it Link to Health?
This session featuring the University of Toronto and the World Health Organization will examine the G8 agenda and how it links to health. The 2010 G8 agenda includes a focus on maternal and child health issues, food security, climate change, and accountability. Panelists will discuss the critical linkages between the non-health issues and achieving progress in global health.

Friday June 18, 2010 10:30am - 12:00pm
Hampton Ballroom

10:45am

Special Session/Policy Track: Global Health Diplomacy
Global health diplomacy is a growing field for both the global health and the diplomatic communities. This session will explore the concept and practice of negotiating health as a key component of foreign policy, from both a development and a diplomatic perspective, and how science and technology play an essential role in improving health throughout the world.

Friday June 18, 2010 10:45am - 11:45am
Ambassador Ballroom

11:00am

W1, Part II: Improving Your Work: Real Ways to Put to Work What You've Learned
Practical ways to use goals in your work:
1. Getting clear. This activity is meant to help participants focus on their own work and how goals can help.
2. What did you come away with? Review and discussion of Session Notes. (Time will be allotted for workshop attendees that did not participate in first workshop to fill in Session Notes worksheets, which are the pages we are suggesting be part of the conference manual.)
3. Networking. Participants will be broken out into smaller groups and asked to meet at least 3 new people with the goal of finding out what that person does and where and then proposing ways that person can get on track to meet their goals.
4. Taking action: Gaining momentum now! Workshop will close with a yearly goal setting exercise. Participants will be asked to set at least one important goal that they will commit to making; they will monitor their progress on a monthly basis and finally commit to returning to the conference next year and to "report"

Friday June 18, 2010 11:00am - 12:45pm
Blue Room

12:00pm

Plenary/Policy Track Luncheon: Global Health Initiative: Where Do We Go from Here?
In May 2009, the Obama Administration first announced a Global Health Initiative, a $63 billion commitment from 2009 through 2015, for global health programs. In February 2010, the Obama Administration fleshed out the initiative through a consultative document that outlined the basic principles of U.S. global health assistance - improved monitoring and evaluation, increased coordination through a health systems approach, and women and girls at the front and center of U.S. global health assistance. Learn from U.S. Government representatives about the roads to implementing this important initiative.

Friday June 18, 2010 12:00pm - 1:45pm
Regency Ballroom

2:00pm

Plenary: Universal Access and aids2031: The Way Forward
aids2031 was commissioned by UNAIDS to take a look a long term view and consider future options for the aids epidemic and response towards 2031, which will mark 50 years of aids. The aids2031 final report will be released in July 2010. A critical emerging recommendation is to tailor HIV prevention and treatment strategies to local needs - which are different not only across, but within countries. Prioritization will be particularly important in resource poor settings. This session will consider how locally tailored responses can help accelerate universal success - where universal access is understood as access to services for those who need them.

Friday June 18, 2010 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Regency Ballroom